Academic Information

Absences from Class

(see "Class Attendance.")

Academic Common Market

Out-of-State Programs at Reduced Tuition

West Virginia residents can pursue academic programs not available within the state through the Academic Common Market (ACM) and through contract programs. Both programs enable West Virginians to enter out of state institutions at reduced tuition rates. Contract programs have been established for study in veterinary medicine, optometry, architecture, and podiatry; ACM provides access to both baccalaureate and graduate programs not otherwise available in West Virginia. The programs are restricted to West Virginia residents who have been accepted for admission to one of the specific programs at designated out of state institutions. For information please contact the Office of Academic Affairs, Old Main 200, (304-696-6840) or the Higher Education Policy Commission.

Out-of-state students who have been granted Academic Common Market access to Marshall University should follow the Academic Common Market Procedures available at www.marshall.edu/academic-affairs/academic-common-market.

Academic Dishonesty Policy

Introduction

As described in the Marshall University Creed, Marshall University is an “Ethical Community reflecting honesty, integrity and fairness in both academic and extracurricular activities.” 

Academic Dishonesty is something that will not be tolerated as these actions are fundamentally opposed to “assuring the integrity of the curriculum through the maintenance of rigorous standards and high expectations for student learning and performance” as described in Marshall University’s Statement of Philosophy.

A student, by voluntarily accepting admission to the institution or enrolling in a class or course of study offered by Marshall University accepts the academic requirements and criteria of the institution. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of policies regulating academic conduct, including the definitions of academic dishonesty, the possible sanctions and the appeal process.

For the purposes of this policy, an academic exercise is defined as any assignment, whether graded or ungraded, that is given in an academic course or must be completed toward the completion of degree or certification requirements. This includes, but is not limited to: Exams, quizzes, papers, oral presentations, data gathering and analysis, practica and creative work of any kind.

Definitions of Academic Dishonesty

Below are definitions of some common types of academic dishonesty.  Each instructor may modify the general definition of academic dishonesty to fit the immediate academic needs within that particular course of study, provided the instructor defines, in writing and preferably in the course syllabus, the details of any departure from the general definition.

  • Cheating: Any action which if known to the instructor in the course of study would be prohibited. This includes:
    •  The unauthorized use of any materials, notes, sources of information, study aids or tools during an academic exercise.
    • The unauthorized assistance of a person other than the course instructor during an academic exercise.
    • The unauthorized viewing of another person’s work during an academic exercise.
    • The unauthorized securing of all or any part of assignments or examinations, in advance of submission by the instructor.
  • Fabrication/Falsification: The unauthorized invention or alteration of any information, citation, data or means of verification in an academic exercise, official correspondence or a university record.
  • Plagiarism: Submitting as one’s own work or creation any material or an idea wholly or in part created by another.  This includes:
    • Oral, written and graphical material.
    • Both published and unpublished work.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to clearly distinguish his/her own work from that created by others. This includes the proper use of quotation marks, paraphrasing and the citation of the original source.  Students are responsible for both intentional and unintentional acts of plagiarism.
  • Bribes/Favors/Threats: Attempting to unfairly influence a course grade or the satisfaction of degree requirements through any of these actions is prohibited.
  • Complicity: Helping or attempting to help someone commit an act of academic dishonesty

Sanctions 

Sanctions for academic dishonesty may be imposed by the instructor of the course, the department chairperson, or the Academic Dean.  Sanctions for academic dishonesty may be imposed even if a student withdraws from an individual course or from the university entirely.   The instructor may impose the following sanctions:

  • A lower or failing project/paper/test grade;
  • A lower final grade;
  • Failure of the course;
  • Exclusion from further participation in the class (including laboratories or clinical experiences).

The following sanctions may be recommended by the instructor but will need to be imposed by the department chair, academic dean or the Office of Academic Affairs:

  • Exclusion from an academic program;
  • Academic probation for up to 1 year;
  • Academic suspension for up to 1 year;
  • Dismissal from the university.

In those cases in which the offense is particularly flagrant or where there are other aggravating circumstances, additional, non-academic, sanctions may be pursued through the Office of Judicial Affairs. A student will be informed in writing by the instructor or responsible office, of any charges and subsequent sanctions imposed for academic dishonesty (See “Reporting” below).  Written notification of academic dishonesty charges (and the inclusion of confirmed charges/sanctions in a student’s records) is designed to inform a student of the potential repercussions of repeat offenses and his/her rights of appeal.

If a student believes that charges of academic dishonesty have been erroneously levied, he/she should appeal such charges in accordance with the process outlined below.

Sanctions for repeated academic dishonesty offenses will be imposed by the Office of Academic Affairs after consultation with the appropriate department chairs and deans. A student’s record of academic dishonesty offenses will be maintained throughout his/her enrollment at Marshall University, and the period of time between offenses may have no impact on sanctions for repeated offenses.

A student with a second academic dishonesty offense during his/her enrollment at Marshall University will be academically suspended for a period of time not to exceed one academic year (to include summer terms).

A student with a third academic dishonesty offense during his/her enrollment at Marshall University will be dismissed from the university.

Reporting:

Any time an accusation an accusation of academic dishonesty is reported to the Office of Academic Affairs, and a sanction imposed (or a sanction will be imposed with the submission of final grades), a notice should be sent to the Office of Academic Affairs within ten (10) days of the accusation.

Notice of an act of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs through the completion of an “Academic Dishonesty Report Form.” The “Academic Dishonesty Report Form” will include:

  • Instructor’s Name
  • Course Information (Term, Number, Section)
  • Student’s Name
  • Student’s University Identification Number
  • Brief Description of the Charge
  • Date of Accusation
  • Brief Description of the Sanction

Instructors are encouraged to give a copy of the “Academic Dishonesty Report Form” to a student accused of an offense.  However, within ten (10) days of receipt of the “Academic Dishonesty Report Form” the Office of Academic Affairs will inform the student and the student’s dean of the accusations made, the sanctions prescribed, the repercussions of repeat offenses, and his/her rights of appeal.  A copy of the report will go into the student’s college file.

Any subsequent actions taken (additional sanctions imposed, the lessening of sanctions, the withdrawal of accusations, the results of appeals, etc.) should be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs within ten (10) days of the action.

Recording:

The Office of Academic Affairs will maintain a file of academic dishonesty incidents. These will be reported in summary form (no student or faculty names will be included) to the Academic Deans and the Faculty Senate at the end of each academic year.

Revised by Marshall University Board of Governors
July 12, 2013

Academic Dismissal

This is defined as termination of student status, including any right or privilege to receive some benefit, or recognition, or certification. A student may be academically dismissed from a limited enrollment program and remain eligible to enroll in courses in other programs at Marshall University; or a student may be academically dismissed from the institution and not remain eligible to enroll in other courses or programs at Marshall University. The terms of academic dismissal from a program for academic deficiency shall be determined, defined, and published by each of the constituent colleges and schools of Marshall University. Academic dismissal from a program or from the University may also be imposed for violation of the University policy on academic dishonesty. For additional details, see “Academic Rights and Responsibilities.”

Academic Forgiveness

The academic forgiveness policy allows forgiveness of D and F grades for purposes of calculating the Grade Point Average (GPA) required for graduation. This policy is designed to help students who left college with low grades. It will be implemented, provided certain conditions are satisfied, where the D and F repeat rule is not applicable:

  • The student must not have been enrolled on a full-time or part-time basis for more than 12 credit hours at any higher education institution for a period of five consecutive calendar years prior to the request for academic forgiveness.;
  • only D and F grades received prior to the five year, non enrollment period can be disregarded for GPA calculation;
  • in order to receive a degree or certificate, the student must complete at least 24 additional credit hours through actual coursework from Marshall University after the non enrollment period, earn at least a 2.0 GPA on all work attempted after the non enrollment period and satisfy all degree or certificate requirements.

Grades disregarded for GPA computation remain on the student’s permanent record. This policy applies only to the calculation of the GPA required for graduation and does not apply to GPA calculation for special academic recognition (such as graduating with honors) or to requirements for professional certification which may be within the province of licensure boards, external agencies, or the West Virginia Board of Education.

A student may apply for academic forgiveness by submitting to his/her college dean an application for “Academic Forgiveness,” available in the college office. The dean can accept, modify, or reject the application and will provide a justification. Students who do not normally qualify for readmission because of a low GPA will, if their request for forgiveness is approved, be readmitted and placed on academic probation. The decision of forgiveness must be made again whenever the student changes programs, departments, colleges, or institutions. (Amended and approved at December 9, 1986, APSC meeting.)

Students should be aware that this policy is not necessarily recognized by other institutions of higher education outside the state of West Virginia.

Exception: The Board of Regents Bachelor of Arts Program is governed by a different forgiveness policy. (See section on Board of Regents degree.)

Academic Probation and Suspension

For information on Financial Aid Probation, please see the section on Student Financial Assistance.

Probation for Academic Deficiencies

All undergraduate students whose Overall or Marshall GPA drops below a 2.0 will be placed on Academic Probation. Academic Probation is a period of restricted enrollment for a student. All probation students are subject to the following restrictions.

  • Students on probation must meet with the Associate/Assistant Dean of their College before registering for classes to develop an Academic Improvement Plan to achieve good academic standing. This plan will be binding on the student.
  • Students on probation may take a maximum of 14 hours and should repeat courses under the D/F Repeat Rule to reduce deficiency points.
  • Students on probation must earn a 2.0 GPA or higher during every semester they are on probation. Failure to achieve a 2.0 semester GPA or higher while on Academic Probation will result in suspension (see below).
  • Students on probation are not allowed to register by myMU.
  • Students on probation must participate in their College’s Retention Program.
  • Other requirements may be imposed in the Academic Improvement Plan.

The student is returned to Academic Good Standing when his or her Marshall and Overall GPA are 2.0 or higher.

Suspension for Academic Deficiencies

Academic Suspension is defined as a period in which a student cannot enroll in courses at Marshall University. A student who has pre-registered and is subsequently suspended will have his/her registration automatically canceled.

  1. Students who earn less than a 2.0 semester GPA while on Academic Probation or who accumulate or exceed the Quality Point Deficit for their GPA Hours (see Table One) will be suspended for one regular semester (the summer terms do not count as a term of suspension).

    Table One – Suspension QPD
    GPA Hours 0-29 30-59 60-89 90 or more
    Quality Point Deficit 20 15 12 9
  2. When a student returns to Marshall after any suspension, the student will be placed on probation and must follow all of the requirements of his/her Academic Improvement Plan. Failure to meet all of the requirements of the Academic Improvement Plan or exceeding the Quality Point Deficits listed in Table 1 will result in suspension. A second suspension will be for a period of one calendar year. Third and subsequent suspensions will be for a period of two calendar years each.
  3. Petition for Reinstatement after a Second or Subsequent Suspension
    Reinstatement after a second or subsequent suspension is only by written petition to the Dean of a student’s college, school, or program. The petition must be in writing and provide evidence that the student can meet the requirements of his or her Academic Improvement Plan. The written petition for readmission must be submitted at least 30 days prior to the beginning of the semester for which readmission is sought.

Probation for Academic Dishonesty

Academic probation for up to 1 year may be recommended by the instructor but will need to be imposed by the department chair, academic dean or the Office of Academic Affairs.

Suspension for Academic Dishonesty

A student with a second academic dishonesty offense during his/her enrollment at Marshall University will be academically suspended for a period of one academic year (to include summer terms).

Appeals of Academic Probation and Suspension

See “Academic Rights and Responsibilities of Students.”

Approved by Faculty Senate, May 9, 2002, to go into effect Fall 2003

Academic Rights and Responsibilities of Students

Marshall University’s policies in regard to the academic rights and responsibilities of students reflect Board of Governors Policy SA-2.

  1. Statement of Philosophy
    Marshall University is an academic community and as such must promulgate and uphold various academic standards. Failure of a student to abide by such standards may result in the imposition of sanctions pursuant to Board of Governors Policy SA-2. A student, by voluntarily accepting admission to the institution or enrolling in a class or course of study offered by Marshall University, accepts the academic requirements and criteria of the institution. It is the student’s responsibility to fulfill coursework and degree, or certification requirements, and to know and meet criteria for satisfactory academic progress and completion of the program.
  2. Definitions
    1. Academic Dean: the chief academic officer of a college or school. The dean also serves in an advisory capacity to the student. The student is encouraged to contact his/her academic dean for guidance on appeal procedures.
    2. Academic Deficiency: failure to maintain the academic requirements and standards as established by Marshall University and its constituent colleges and schools other than those relating to academic dishonesty. This shall include but is not limited to the criteria for maintenance of satisfactory academic progress, i.e. Grade Point Average, special program requirements, professional standards, etc.
    3. Academic Dishonesty: Academic dishonesty is conduct on an academic exercise that falls into one or more of the following categories: cheating, fabrication/falsification, plagiarism, bribes/favors/threats, and complicity. These categories and “academic exercise” are defined in detail in the section on Academic Dishonesty in this catalog. Each instructor may modify the general definition of academic dishonesty to fit the immediate academic needs within that particular course of study, provided the instructor defines, in writing and preferably in the course syllabus, the details of any departure from the general definition.
    4. Day: shall refer to an instructional day.
    5. Limited Enrollment Program: any academic program which imposes admissions requirements in addition to general admissions to the University.
    6. Student: any undergraduate student who has been admitted to, and is currently enrolled in, a course or in a certificate or degree program at Marshall University, or for whom the institutional appeal period has not expired. Students enrolled in the undergraduate Nursing Program will follow these procedures.
    7. University Community: faculty, staff, or students at Marshall University.
    8. President’s Designee: Chief Academic Officer.
    9. Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs: refers to the Chief Academic Officer.
    10. Appeal Deadlines: the time allowed for each level of appeal. There will be no time extensions unless granted by the Academic Appeals Board for good cause. If the appeals do not meet the established deadlines, the issue is no longer appealable.
  3. Student Academic Rights
    Concomitant with other academic standards and responsibilities established by Marshall University and its constituent colleges and schools, each student shall have the following academic rights:
    1. The student shall be graded or have his/her performance evaluated solely upon performance in the coursework as measured against academic standards.
    2. The student shall not be evaluated prejudicially, capriciously, or arbitrarily.
    3. The student shall not be graded nor shall his/her performance be evaluated on the basis of his/her race, color, creed, sex, sexual orientation, or national origin.
    4. Each student shall have the right to have any academic penalty, as set forth herein, reviewed pursuant to the procedures in Section V. Except in those cases where a specific time is provided, this review shall occur within a reasonable time after the request for such review is made.
    5. Each student shall have access to the University catalog or program brochure in which current academic program requirements are described (e.g., required courses, total credit requirements, time in residence standards, minimum Grade Point Average, probation standards, professional standards, etc.).
    6. Each student shall receive from the instructor written descriptions of content and requirements for any course in which he/she is enrolled (e.g., attendance expectations, special requirements, laboratory requirements including time, field trips and cost, grading criteria, standards and procedures, professional standards, etc.).
    7. The instructor of each course is responsible for assigning grades to the students enrolled in the course consistent with the academic rights set out in the preceding sections.
    8. Marshall University and its constituent colleges and schools are responsible for defining and promulgating:
      1. The academic requirements for admission to the institution, for admission to limited enrollment programs, and for admission to professional and graduate degree programs;
      2. The criteria for maintenance of satisfactory academic progress, for the successful completion of the program, for the award of a degree or certification, for graduation;
      3. The requirements or criteria for any other academic endeavor, and the requirements for student academic honesty, consistent with the Policies, Rules, and Regulations of the Higher Education Policy Commission and with the fundamentals of due process; and
      4. Probation, suspension, and dismissal standards and requirements.
    9. Normally, a student has the right to finish a program of study according to the requirements under which he/she was admitted to the program. Requirements, however, are subject to change at any time, provided that reasonable notice is given to any student affected by the change.
  4. Academic Sanctions: Undergraduate Students (Graduate and Medical Students Should Consult the Graduate Catalog.)
    A student who fails to meet the academic requirements or standards, or who fails to abide by the University policy on academic dishonesty, as defined by Marshall University, and its constituent colleges and schools, may be subject to one or more of the following academic sanctions:

A. A lower final grade in or a failure of the course or exclusion from further participation in the class (including laboratories or clinical experiences, any or all of which may be imposed by the instructor of the course involved).

B. Academic Probation

1. For Academic Deficiency:

  • Any student who has less than a 2.0 Grade Point Average on coursework attempted at Marshall University and/or any approved coursework transferred from another institution shall be placed on academic probation. All probation students are subject to the following restrictions:
    • Meet with the Associate/Assistant Dean of their college before registering for classes to develop an Academic Improvement Plan to achieve good academic standing. This plan will be binding on the student.
    • Take a maximum of 14 hours and should repeat courses under the D/F Repeat Rule to reduce deficiencies.
    • Earn a 2.0 GPA or higher during every semester they are on probation. Failure to achieve a 2.0 semester GPA or higher while on probation will result in suspension.
    • May not register by myMU.
    • Must participate in their College’s retention program.
    •  Other requirements may be imposed  in the Academic Improvement Plan

2. For Academic Dishonesty
Sanctions for academic dishonesty may be imposed by the instructor of the course, the department chairperson, or the Academic Dean. Sanctions for academic dishonesty may be imposed even if a student withdraws from an individual course or from the university entirely.

a. The instructor may impose the following sanctions:

  • A lower or failing project/paper/test grade.
  • A lower final grade.
  • Failure of the course.
  • Exclusion from further participation in the class (including laboratories or clinical experiences.)

b. The instructor may also refer the matter to his/her department chairperson for additional sanctions. If allegations are referred to the department chairperson, it must be within thirty (30) days from the date of the alleged offense. This process starts with the dean if there is no department chairperson. The following sanctions may be recommended by the instructor but will need to be imposed by the department chair, academic dean or the Office of Academic Affairs:

  • Exclusion from an academic program.
  • Academic probation for up to one (1) year.
  • Academic suspension for up to one (1) year.
  • Dismissal from the university.

c. In those cases in which the offense is particularly flagrant or where there are other aggravating circumstances, additional, non-academic sanctions may be pursued through the Office of Judicial Affairs.
d. A student will be informed in writing by the instructor or responsible office of any charges and subsequent sanctions imposed for academic dishonesty.  Written notification of academic dishonesty charges (and the inclusion of confirmed charges/sanctions in the student’s records) is designed to inform a student of the potential repercussions of repeat offenses and his/her rights of appeal.
e. Any time an accusation of academic dishonesty is made, and a sanction imposed (or a sanction will be imposed with the submission of final grades), a notice should be sent to the Office of Academic Affairs within ten (10) days of the accusation. The notice of an act of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs through the completion of an “Academic Dishonesty Report Form.” Instructors are encouraged to give a copy of the “Academic Dishonesty Form” to a student accused of an offense. However, the Office of Academic Affairs will inform the student and the student’s dean of the accusations made, the sanctions prescribed, the repercussions of repeat offenses, and his/her right of appeal. A copy of the report will go into the student’s college file. Any subsequent actions taken (additional sanctions imposed, the lessening of sanctions, the withdrawal of accusations, the results of appeals, etc.) should be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs within ten (10) days.
The Office of Academic Affairs will maintain a file of academic dishonesty incidents. These will be reported in summary form (no student or faculty names will be included) to the Academic Deans and the Faculty Senate at the end of each academic year.
f. Sanctions for repeated academic dishonesty offenses will be imposed by the Office of Academic Affairs after consultation with the appropriate department chairs and deans.

  • A student’s record of academic dishonesty offenses will be maintained throughout his/her enrollment at Marshall University, and the period of time between offenses may have no impact on sanctions for repeated offenses.
  • A student with a second academic dishonesty offense during his/her enrollment at Marshall University will be academically suspended for a period of time not to exceed one academic year (to include summer terms.)
  • A student with a third academic dishonesty offense during his/her enrollment at Marshall University will be dismissed from the university.·

C. Academic Suspension: Undergraduate Students (Graduate and Medical Students Should Consult the Graduate Catalog.)

1. For Academic Deficiency
Students who earn less than a 2.0 semester GPA while on Academic Probation or who accumulate or exceed the Quality Point Deficit for their GPA hours  will be suspended for one regular semester (the summer terms do not count as a term of suspension). Students with 0-29 GPA hours will be suspended if they have 20 or more quality point deficiencies; with 30-59 hours, they will be suspended with 15 or more quality point deficiencies; with 60-89 hours, they will be suspended with 12 or more deficiencies; and with 90 or more hours, they will be suspended with 9 or more deficiencies.
When a student returns to Marshall after any suspension, the student will be placed on probation and must follow all of the requirements of his/her Academic Improvement Plan. Failure to meet all of the requirements of the Academic Improvement Plan or exceeding the Quality Point Deficits described above will result in suspension. A second suspension will be for a period of one calendar year. Third and subsequent suspensions will be for a period of two calendar years each.
2. For Academic Dishonesty
In those cases in which a student has been found guilty of a second academic dishonesty offense, he/she will be academically suspended for a period of time not to exceed one academic year (to include summer terms). During such period the student may not enroll in any course or program offered by Marshall University or any of its constituent colleges or schools. 

D. Academic Dismissal
This is defined as termination of student status, including any right or privilege to receive some benefit, or recognition, or certification. A student may be academically dismissed from a limited enrollment program and remain eligible to enroll in courses in other programs at Marshall University; or a student may be academically dismissed from the institution and not remain eligible to enroll in other courses or programs at Marshall University. The terms of academic dismissal from a program for academic deficiency shall be determined, defined, and published by each of the constituent colleges and schools of Marshall University. Academic dismissal from a program or from the University will also be imposed for violation of the University policy on academic dishonesty.

V. Academic Appeals

The intent of the appeals process is to treat all parties fairly, and to make all parties aware of the appeals procedure. Please Note: Notwithstanding any other provision in Marshall University catalogs or policy documents, only students who are or will be dismissed from a program or from the University as a direct and immediate consequence of any academic sanction administered by the University may, at their own discretion and expense, retain legal counsel for representation during all relevant administrative appeal proceedings.

A. Student Appeals for Instructor Imposed Sanctions:

In cases where a student is appealing a grade, the grade appealed shall remain in effect until the appeal procedure is completed, or the problem resolved.

In those cases in which a student has received an instructor-imposed sanction, including a lower final grade in or failure of the course or exclusion from further participation in the class, the student shall follow the procedures outlined below:

1. The student should first attempt a resolution with the course instructor. This initial step must be taken within ten (10) days from the imposition of the sanction or, in the case of an appeal of a final grade in the course, within thirty (30) days of the beginning of the next regular term (Fall or Spring). The student who makes an appeal is responsible for submitting all applicable documentation. The course instructor is to respond to the student in writing within ten (10) days after the student has submitted the appeal documentation. If the course instructor does not respond to the student in the given time frame, the appeal process continues to the next level. If the instructor is unavailable for any reason, the process starts with the department chairperson or division head.

2. If the procedure in Step 1 does not have a mutually satisfactory result, the student may appeal in writing to the department chairperson or division head within ten (10) days after the action taken in Step 1, who will attempt to resolve the issue at the departmental level. The department chairperson or division head is to respond to the student in writing within ten (10) days after the student has submitted the appeal documentation. If the department chairperson or division head (or representative) does not respond to the student in the given time frame, the appeal process continues to the next level. When a student appeals a final grade, the faculty member must provide all criteria used for determining grades.

3. Should the issue not be resolved at the departmental level, either the student or instructor may appeal in writing to the Dean of the college in which the course is offered within ten (10) days of the action taken in Step 2.  This person is to respond to the student or instructor in writing within ten (10) days after the student has submitted the appeal documentation and will attempt to achieve a mutually satisfactory resolution. If the person named above does not respond to the student in the given time frame, the appeal process continues to the next level. The Dean of the college in which the student is enrolled will be notified.

4. Should the issue not be resolved by the Dean of the college within which the course is offered, either the student or instructor may appeal in writing within ten (10) days of the action taken in Step 3 to the Budget and Academic Policy Committee which shall refer the matter to the University Academic Appeals Board which determines if an appeal hearing is justified. If the University Academic Appeals Board determines a hearing is justified, the Board will schedule the hearing. The University Academic Appeals Board has the right to seek additional documentation if necessary. The University Academic Appeals Board has thirty (30) days to convene the members of the Hearing Panel to hear the appeal (once the requested documentation is provided by the appellant student) and ten (10) days after the hearing to make notification of the determination to the student and instructor. It may not always be possible to meet the above conditions because many of these appeals occur at times when school is not in session. However every effort will be made to schedule appeal hearings in a timely and reasonable manner

5. Should the student or the instructor be dissatisfied with the determination of the Academic Appeals Board then then either party may file an appeal with the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs within thirty (30) days of receipt of the decision of the Board. The decision of the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs must be rendered in writing within ten (10) days of receipt of the appeal, and shall be final.

B. Appeals for Academic Dishonesty:
Only individual allegations of academic dishonesty may be appealed. If a previous offense was not appealed within the time limit, or was appealed unsuccessfully, then subsequent offenses will be counted as repeat offenses and additional sanctions will be levied by the Office of Academic Affairs as described in the section on “Sanctions” in this policy.

1. In those cases where the instructor imposes a sanction pursuant to part IV, A, only, and does not refer the matter to the department chairperson or division head for additional sanctions, the student may appeal the sanction in accordance with the procedures described in part V. Academic Appeals (A).

2. In those cases where the matter is referred to the department chairperson or division head for additional sanctions, this action must occur within thirty (30) days of the alleged offense. The chairperson or division head shall bring together the student involved, and the faculty member, and/or other complainant within ten (10) days from the date of referral.

3. If the student denies guilt or disagrees with the sanction imposed, or if the faculty member, other complainant, or chairperson or division head thinks that the penalties are insufficient for the act complained of, the case shall be forwarded in writing by the chairperson or division head to the student’s Academic Dean within ten (10) days from the date of the meeting. This person shall bring together the student, faculty member or other complainant, and the department chairperson or division head to review the charges within ten (10) days from the date of referral. The student’s Academic Dean may impose any sanction permitted by this policy.

4. Should the student, faculty member, or other complainant be dissatisfied with the determination of the student’s  Academic Dean, the case may be appealed in writing within ten (10) days of the written decision to the Budget and Academic Policy Committee, who shall refer the case to the University Academic Appeals Board which determines if an appeal hearing is justified. If the University Academic Appeals Board determines a hearing is justified, the Board will schedule the hearing. The University Academic Appeals Board has the right to seek additional documentation if necessary. The University Academic Appeals Board has thirty (30) days to convene the members of the Hearing Panel to hear the appeal (once the requested documentation is provided by the appellant student) and ten (10) days after the hearing to make notification of the determination to the student and instructor. It may not always be possible to meet the above conditions because many of these appeals occur at times when school is not in session. However every effort will be made to schedule appeal hearings in a timely and reasonable manner. 

5. Should the student, faculty member, or other complainant be dissatisfied with the determination of the Academic Appeals Board or the Hearing Panel, then he/she may file an appeal with the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs within thirty (30) days from the receipt of the written decision of the Board or Panel.

6. The decision of the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs shall be final.

C. Appeals for Academic Deficiencies:

1. In those cases in which an undergraduate student has been denied admission to a program, has been or may be placed on academic probation or academic suspension for academic deficiencies, the following procedures are applicable:

a.  The student is entitled to written notice; (1) of the nature of the deficiency or reason for denial of admission to a program; (2) of the methods, if any, by which the student may correct the deficiency, and; (3) of the penalty which may be imposed as a consequence of the deficiency.

b.  The student shall be given the opportunity to meet with the person(s) who has judged his/her performance to be deficient, to discuss with this person(s) the information forming the basis of the judgment or opinion of his/her performance; to present information or evidence on his/her behalf; and to be accompanied at any such meeting by an advisor of his/her choice from the University (faculty, staff, or student). Such advisors may consult with, but may not speak on behalf of their advisees, or otherwise participate directly in the proceedings, unless given specific permission to do so by the person conducting the meeting. The student is not entitled to an attorney in such meetings, and the formal rules of evidence are not applicable. The student must request such meeting in writing ten (10) days from receipt of the notice.

c.  If the student is dissatisfied with the outcome of the meeting outlined in (b) above, the student may appeal the judgment to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs within thirty (30) days after receipt of written notice of the judgment.

d. The decision of the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs is final.

2. In those cases in which a student has been or may be dismissed from an undergraduate academic program, or has been or may be dismissed from the institution for academic deficiencies, the following procedures are applicable:

a. The student is entitled to written notice; (1) of the nature of the deficiency; (2) of the methods, if any, by which the student may correct the deficiency, and; (3) of the penalty which may be imposed as a consequence of the deficiency.

b. The student shall be given the opportunity to meet with the person(s) who judged his/her performance to be deficient. The student must request such meeting in writing within ten (10) days from receipt of the notice. The student shall be given the opportunity to discuss with this person(s) the information forming the basis of the judgment or opinion of his/her performance, to present information or evidence on his/her behalf, and to be accompanied at any such meeting by an advisor of his/her choice from the University (faculty, staff, or student). Such advisor may consult with but may not speak on behalf of his/her advisee, or otherwise participate directly in the proceedings, unless given specific permission to do so by the person conducting the meeting. The student is not entitled to an attorney in such meetings, and the formal rules of evidence are not applicable.

c. If the student is dissatisfied with the outcome of the meeting outlined in (b) above, the student may file an appeal in writing with the Chairperson of the Budget and Academic Policy Committee. The Chairperson of the Budget and Academic Policy Committee will refer the matter to the University Academic Appeals Board which determines if an appeal hearing is justified. If the University Academic Appeals Board determines a hearing is justified, the Board will schedule the hearing. The University Academic Appeals Board has the right to seek additional documentation if necessary. The University Academic Appeals Board has thirty (30) days to convene the members of the Hearing Panel to hear the appeal (once the requested documentation is provided by the appellant student) and ten (10) days after the hearing to make notification of the determination to the student and instructor. If the student is denied an appeal, he/she may appeal this decision to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs. If the student is granted an appeal, the Chairperson of the Academic Appeals Board will appoint a Hearing Panel. At least two (2) of the faculty and student members of the Hearing Panel will, if possible, be chosen from the members of the Hearing Panel Pool appointed from the constituent college or school involved. It may not always be possible to meet the above conditions because many of these appeals occur at times when school is not in session. However every effort will be made to schedule appeal hearings in a timely and reasonable manner. The student’s appeal must be filed within ten (10) days after receipt of written notice of the decision outlined in (b) above.

d. If the student, faculty member or other complainant is dissatisfied with the decision of the Hearing Panel, he or she may appeal the decision to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs within thirty (30) days after receipt of written notice of the decision.

e. The decision of the Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs is final.

VI.  Academic Appeals Board

A. Description and Jurisdiction:
The Academic Appeals Board is a permanent subcommittee of the Budget and Academic Policy Committee. It is composed of experienced Hearing Officers and is established to determine whether appeals arising from the following should result in a hearing:

1. Instructor-imposed sanctions, including: lowering of final course grade, failure of course, or exclusion from further participation in the class.
2. Final course grades.
3. Sanctions imposed for academic dishonesty.
4. Dismissal from an academic program.
5. Dismissal from the University.
6. Such other cases as may be referred to the Board.

B. Function:
The University Academic Appeals Board collectively decides whether:

a) The prior steps of the appeal process have been completed.
b) The claim (if substantiated) would result in the overturning of the academic sanction. This means that some policy may have been violated in the application of the sanction, arbitrariness or capriciousness may been a factor in the sanction, different standards may have been applied to the student or there may have been bad faith or ill will on the part of the instructor’s applying of the sanction.
c) Appropriate documentation of the claim needs to be provided in order to justify a hearing. It is the student’s job to provide documentation for his/her claims. The Board may ask for additional documentation from either students or faculty in order to determine whether a hearing is justified.

VII. Hearing Panel
The purpose of the Hearing Panel is to hear arguments, evaluate evidence, and reach a decision by voting in an Academic Hearing. 

A. The Hearing Panel shall be composed of faculty and student members chosen in the following manner:

1. Faculty Members:
The Dean of each of the constituent colleges and schools of the University shall appoint five (5) faculty members from his/her unit to serve on the Hearing Panel Pool. Such appointments will be made annually in the spring semester with the understanding that some of these faculty members will be available to hear appeals during the summer terms and the week before the beginning of Spring semester. Terms will run from May 15 to the following May 15.

2. Student Members:
The Student Government Association President shall appoint three (3) students from each of the constituent colleges and schools of the University to serve on the Hearing Panel Pool.

3. Hearing Officers:

The Budget and Academic Policy Committee will appoint two Hearing Officers each spring. It is desirable but not required that the Hearing Officers have served on a Hearing Panel.

B. Selection of Members for an Individual Hearing Panel

An individual Hearing Panel shall be composed of two (2) faculty members, one (1) student member, and one (1) non-voting Hearing Officer. The members of the Hearing Panel shall be chosen randomly from the Hearing Panel Pool by the Chairperson of the Academic Appeals Board or his/her designee. In appeals arising from dismissal from an academic program, if possible, at least two (2) of the faculty and student members of the Hearing pPanel should be chosen from the Hearing Panel Pool members appointed from the constituent college or school involved.

VIII. Hearing Procedures

It is the intent of these procedures to ensure that Marshall University students receive appropriate due process in academic matters. This includes fundamental fairness, just sanctions, and all rights in accordance with the belief that academic appeal hearings at an institution of higher education such as Marshall University should have an educational objective. Academic appeals, pursuant to these procedures, are informal and not adversarial in nature.

A. The time and place of the hearing is determined by the Hearing Officer. The hearing should be held within sixty (60) days of receiving the written request. Upon written request, the Hearing Officer may, at his/her discretion, grant a continuance to any party for good cause.

B. The Hearing Officer will notify the appellee, appellant, and other appropriate parties in writing at least five (5) days prior to the hearing, of the date, time, and place of the hearing. A statement of the facts and evidence to be presented in support of the student’s grounds for appeal will be provided to the appellee in appropriate cases.

C. The appellant student and the appellee have the right to an advisor. Advisors must be members of the University community (faculty, staff, or student). Such advisors may consult with, but may not speak on behalf of their advisees or otherwise participate directly in the proceedings, unless they are given specific permission to do so by the Hearing Officer. 

D. The appellant student has the right, at his or her own discretion and expense, to retain legal counsel for representation only when he/she is or will be dismissed from a program or from the University as a direct and immediate consequence of any academic sanction administered by the University. In these cases an attorney is allowed to fully represent and speak on behalf of the appellant student. Rules of evidence and other formal rules of courtroom procedure do not apply. The Hearing Officer is authorized to decide what is relevant and what is not relevant.

E. Prior to the scheduled hearing, the members of the Hearing Panel may convene in closed session to examine the content of the appeal, the specific issues to be considered, and all supporting documents.

F. The student with his/her advisor, if any, will be called before the Hearing Panel and the Hearing Officer will then restate the nature of the appeal and the issues to be decided.

G. The hearing shall be closed. All persons to be called as witnesses, other than the appellant, with his/her advisor, if any, and the appellee and his/her advisor, if any, will be excluded from the hearing room. Any person who remains in the room after the hearing has begun may be prohibited from appearing as a witness at the discretion of the Hearing Officer.

H. Anyone disrupting the hearing may be excluded from the hearing room if, after due warning, he/she engages in conduct which substantially delays or disrupts the hearing, in which case the hearing shall continue and the Hearing Panel shall make a determination based on the evidence presented. If excluded, the person may be readmitted on the assurance of good behavior. Any person who refuses the Hearing Panel’s order to leave the hearing room may be subject to appropriate disciplinary action pursuant to Marshall University policy. When a student appellant is excluded for disruptive behavior and does not have a recognized representative, the Hearing Officer will appoint one.

I.  Except as provided in H and M herein, all evidence must be presented in the presence of the student.

J. The student or other parties involved may petition the Hearing Officer for a subpoena or a request for appropriate written information or documents

K. The student will be given the opportunity to testify and present evidence and witnesses on his/her own behalf and to discuss with, and question, those persons against whom the appeal is filed. Written evidence to be considered by the panelists should be received by the Hearing Officer at least five (5) business days prior to the hearing to be distributed to the panelists prior to the hearing. Exceptions to this five (5) day rule are at the discretion of the Hearing Officer, who may disallow long written documents or large numbers of documents from being introduced if the panelists will not have time to consider them fully.

L. The Hearing Panel may admit as evidence any testimony, written documents, or demonstrative evidence which it believes is relevant to a fair determination of the issues. Formal rules of evidence shall not be applicable in academic appeal hearings.

M. If the student appellant or the appellee fails to appear at a hearing and fails to make advance explanation for such absence which is satisfactory to the Hearing Panel, or if the student appellant or the appellee leaves before the conclusion of the hearing without permission of the Hearing Panel, the hearing may continue and the Hearing Panel may make a determination on the evidence presented at the hearing, or the Hearing Panel may, at its discretion, dismiss the appeal.

N. Upon completion of the testimony and presentation of evidence, all persons, except Hearing Panel members will be required to leave the room. The Hearing Panel will then meet in closed session to review the evidence presented. The Hearing Panel shall make its findings based upon a preponderance of evidence. The Hearing Panel shall reach its determination by a majority vote. The results shall be recorded in writing and filed with the Chairperson of the Budget and Academic Policy Committee and the Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs. If the Hearing Panel’s decision includes the imposition of academic sanction, the sanction given and its duration must be specified for the record. A report of a dissenting opinion or opinions may be submitted to the Chairperson of the Budget and Academic Policy Committee and the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs by any Hearing Officer.

O. The findings of the Hearing Panel, and any sanction, shall be announced at the conclusion of the hearing. The student, faculty member, and the appropriate Academic Dean shall be notified in writing of the findings and any sanction at the conclusion of the hearing. A record of the hearing shall be prepared by the Hearing Officer in the form of summary minutes and relevant attachments and will be provided to the student upon request.

P.  No one may tape the proceedings.

Q. In an appeal related to a final grade the Hearing Officer will complete any necessary change of grade forms and submit that information to the Registrar, the faculty member, and the appropriate Academic Dean.

R. Within thirty (30) days following receipt of the Hearing Panel’s decision, the student, faculty member or other complainant may file an appeal with the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs.  A written brief stating grounds for the appeal should be presented by the student, faculty member or other complainant to the Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs. The scope of review shall be limited to the following:

1. Procedural errors.
2. Evidence not available at the time of the hearing.
3. Insufficient evidence to support the findings of the Hearing Panel or of the Academic Appeals Board.
4. Misinterpretation of University policies and regulations by the Hearing Panel or by the Academic Appeals Board.
5. A sanction disproportionate to the offense.
6. Lack of jurisdiction.

The Provost and Senior Vice President of Academic Affairs may affirm or modify the panel’s findings and sanctions, if any, or remand the case to the Academic Appeals Board for further action.

S.  The decision of the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs is final.  He/she will give written notification of the final decision to the student, the faculty member, the appropriate Academic Dean and as appropriate, the Registrar.

Approved by the Academic Standards and Curricular Review Committee: October 28, 1988

Approved by the Budget and Academic Policy Committee: October 21, 2004; March 4, 2005; April 17, 2009.

Revised by Faculty Senate: March 19, 2002; February 27, 2003; November 18, 2004; March 31, 2005; May 7, 2009.

Academic Suspension

See “Academic Probation and Suspension.”

Academic Standing

(for more detailed information, see “Academic Rights and Responsibilities of Students”)

Students receive official notification of academic standing in their grade report at the end of the regular semester or summer session.

Academic standing is defined by one of three categories:

  1. Good Standing:
    The student is in good standing when the cumulative Marshall and Overall GPA (includes Marshall grades and any grades earned at other institutions), is at least 2.0. For purposes of participation in extracurricular activities, a student is considered to be in good standing if he or she is eligible to enroll in classes that semester and not under specific restriction as described in the Marshall University Code of Student Rights and Responsibilities, Section C (1-3). Individual activities or organizations may have further requirements for participation such as minimum GPA.
  2. Academic Probation: The student is placed on academic probation at the end of any regular semester or summer session when either the cumulative Marshall or Overall GPA (includes Marshall grades and any grades earned at other institutions) is less than 2.0. The student will be notified by mail/e-mail that a hold has been placed on registration activity. This means the student cannot register or make schedule changes in myMU. All registration activity must take place in person at the Office of the Registrar or through the student’s advisor. After seeing his or her advisor, the student must also get written permission from the associate dean, or appropriate college representative, of his/her college to register or make schedule changes. If a student on academic probation is taking an add/drop slip to the Office of the Registrar for course registration or adjustment, an Academic Improvement Plan (AIP) must accompany the slip at the time of registration.
  3. Academic Suspension:
    If a student exceeds the maximum quality point deficits in the cumulative Marshall or Overall GPA (includes Marshall grades and any grades earned at other institutions) for his or her GPA hours at the end of any given semester, he or she will be suspended for the following semester. The college dean notifies suspended students by mail that a hold has been placed on their registration status and their registration for the following semester has been canceled (excluding summer terms). Please see “Academic Probation and Suspension” for details.

Accelerated Graduate Degree (AGD)

Marshall University offers an accelerated path through a number of its graduate degree programs. We encourage qualified undergraduates to consider participating in an Accelerated Graduate Degree (AGD) option, as it allows them to complete the requirements for the baccalaureate and graduate degree in less time and at lower cost..

Undergraduates accepted into an AGD program can begin taking graduate coursework during their senior year. Programs offering an accelerated master’s degree option may allow up to 12 hours of graduate-level coursework. Programs offering an accelerated doctoral degree option may allow up to 18 hours of graduate-level coursework..

Programs may use one of two models for the AGD option. For those offering a 3+ graduate option, the department may allow specified graduate-level courses to double-count as fulfilling a portion of the bachelor’s and master’s degree requirements. For those offering an accelerated graduate degree option, the department will specify the graduate-level courses that to double-­count as fulfilling a portion of the bachelor’s and master’s degree requirements and those graduate-level courses that will serve as electives for completion of the baccalaureate degree but not the graduate degree. Each program offering an AGD will clearly list how students may count courses for both degrees in the description of the degree options presented subsequently in this catalog.

Advantages of an Accelerated Degree

  • complete the Bachelor’s degree with up to 12 fewer credit hours (Note: Students must meet all other degree requirements for the bachelor’s degree);
  • begin work on the graduate degree during the senior year;
  • complete a portion of graduate credits paying undergraduate tuition rates;
  • earn a bachelor’s and graduate degree in less time.

Programs Available

Currently, the Accelerated Graduate Degree is offered in these master’s programs:

  • Biological Sciences
  • Criminal Justice
  • Geography
  • Health Informatics
  • Psychology
  • Sociology
  • Sport Administration

Please check with the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) for additional AGD programs.

Eligibility Requirements for Accelerated Graduate Degree

  • must have completed at least 90 hours toward the bachelor’s degree;
  • must have at least a 3.30 overall undergraduate GPA;
  • must have at least a 3.30 GPA in the major;
  • must meet the admission requirements of the chosen master’s degree program. (Note: AGD programs may have admission requirements that differ from the admission requirements for the regular master’s degree. For example, some departments might waive the required admission test, such as the GRE, GMAT or Miller Analogies. Students should check with the chosen graduate degree program.)

How to Apply

  1. During the junior or senior year, eligible students should meet with their undergraduate advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies of their chosen graduate degree program to develop an AGD Plan of Study. The Plan of Study form is available from the Graduate College office or online at the Graduate College website. The completed, signed, and approved Plan of Study must be submitted to the Graduate College. Any changes to the AMD Plan of Study must be approved by the undergraduate advisor and Director of Graduate Studies and submitted in writing to the Dean of the Graduate College.
  2. The student’s acceptance into the AGD program is subject to the approval of the Plan of Study by the Dean of the Graduate College.
  3. Students accepted into the AGD program should apply for admission to the chosen graduate degree program for the first semester after the bachelor’s degree is awarded. Applications should be submitted during the last semester of the senior year.

Requirements for Continuation in the AGD Degree Program

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 for all graduate credit toward their graduate degree program.

Withdrawal from the AGD

A student may withdraw at any time from an approved AGD program by informing the undergraduate advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Dean of the Graduate College in writing. A student’s status will then revert to the standard undergraduate degree program. Any graduate hours earned must be approved for use in fulfillment of bachelor’s degree requirements by the student’s Undergraduate Dean.

From Undergraduate to Graduate Student

Beginning with the semester after the student has earned the bachelor’s degree and has been accepted into a master’s degree program, the student is enrolled in the Graduate College and is assessed tuition and fees at the graduate rate. All rules regarding graduate education will apply to the student once admitted into the graduate degree program.

Additional Baccalaureate Degrees

It is possible to earn more than one baccalaureate degree by meeting these requirements:

  • completing all of the major and minor requirements for the desired degree;
  • completing a minimum of 30 additional hours for each degree beyond the 120 hours required for the first baccalaureate degree (this means completing a total 150 hours for a second baccalaureate, 180 for a third baccalaureate, and so on);
  • meeting the minimum residency requirement of 24 credit hours.

Grade Point Averages and graduation with honors must conform to existing university policies.

Advising

Although students are ultimately responsible for selecting a major and planning their course schedules, advising services are available to all students.

  • The college office may assign an advisor to students with a declared major.
  • Undecided students are advised by University College.
  • Students on academic probation are also required to meet with the associate dean of their college for written approval to register or change their schedule.

The academic advisor is a very good person to get to know. He or she will help with advice and support with academic or career questions. Students usually see their advisors during registration periods, but all faculty advisors are available during office hours throughout the semester. Students should take the initiative and arrange an appointment with their advisors at any time during the semester when they need advice or help.

Some colleges require their students to consult with an academic advisor before they can register. The college office places an advising hold on the student’s registration. This hold remains until the student has met with the appropriate advisor. Students should consult their college dean or major department for specific advising requirements.

Appeals Board

See “Academic Appeals” under “Academic Rights and Responsibilities.”

Area of Emphasis

An area of emphasis is a specific subject area of study which has limited course offerings within an approved degree program and major. Normally, a minimum of twelve (12) credit hours would be expected for an area of emphasis at the undergraduate level.

Auditing Courses

Audit students enroll only for purposes of refreshing or acquainting themselves with the material offered in the course. Students can audit a course when there is space available in the class and the instructor authorizes audit status. Audit students receive no academic credit. Enrollment for audit is limited to the regular registration period for the semester or term. A student must enroll for the course as an Audit, and must pay fees in the same way and at the same tuition rate as students enrolling for credit. Faculty members who wish to audit courses must secure approval of the instructor of the course and must enroll in the regular way. The instructor of the course will determine attendance and any other special requirements for audit students. It is the instructor’s responsibility to discuss the requirements of the course with the auditor. The instructor can notify the student’s college dean and the Registrar’s Office to withdraw the auditor from the class if attendance or other requirements are not met. A student cannot change a registration from credit to audit or audit to credit after the close of the Schedule Adjustment period at the beginning of a semester or summer term.

Catalog of Record

The catalog of record is the academic catalog that is in effect at the time the student declares a major. It identifies the graduation requirements that must be met to earn the degree. Once a major is declared, the catalog of record remains the same. A student has 10 years in which to complete the degree. If within that 10 year period the student changes majors or transfers colleges at Marshall, the catalog at the time of the change of major becomes the catalog of record. The student then has 10 years in which to complete the degree under the new catalog. If a student exceeds the 10 year period, the catalog of record is the one in effect at the date of graduation. Students must meet the graduation requirements in this catalog. A student may change a catalog year without a change of program or minor only to a more recent catalog. The student may request this change formally through the office of their dean. Students can substitute courses no longer offered with the permission of their college dean. (Education majors: see the residency requirements in the College of Education and Professional Development section of this catalog.)

Class Attendance

Policy Statement

Students are expected to attend punctually all class meetings, laboratory sessions, and field experiences and to participate in all class assignments and activities as described in the Course Syllabus. Absences are counted from the first class meeting after the student registers. Students registering late are expected to make up all missed assignments in a manner determined by the instructor. Students should be aware that excessive absences, whether excused or unexcused, may affect their ability to earn a passing grade.

The instructor of each class shall establish a policy on class attendance and make-up work, and provide the policy to students in the Course Syllabus. This policy must not conflict with university policies, including this policy. Class attendance may be a criterion in determining a student’s final grade in the course if the instructor provides a statement to this effect in the course syllabus.

Students must promptly consult with their instructors about all class absences. Instructors will work with students to identify appropriate documentation and discuss any missed class time, tests, or assignments.

Except in the case of University Excused Absences, it is the decision of the instructor to excuse an absence or to allow for additional time to make up missed tests or assignments. A student may not be penalized for an excused absence, provided that the student, in a manner determined by the instructor, makes up the work that has been missed.

Instructors are required to honor valid University Excused Absences and to provide reasonable and equitable means for students to make up work missed as a result of those absences. Academic obligations that cannot be made up should be addressed by the course instructor in consultation with the student to ensure that continued enrollment is feasible while there is still an opportunity to drop the course within the established withdrawal period.

This policy excludes academic endeavors that require the completion of a specific number of clock hours, such as clinical experiences, practica, and internships. For those courses, the department chair or program supervisor will determine the maximum number of absences. This policy does not supersede program accreditation requirements.

This policy also excludes laboratory courses that require significant preparation and monitoring. For such courses, departments will determine the minimum number of laboratories a student must complete to pass the course. If a student cannot complete this number of labs, the instructor may recommend that the student withdraw from the class.

If the instructor believes that the number of absences accrued under the terms of this policy (whether excused or unexcused) is such that a student cannot fulfill the learning experience and mastery that a course requires, the instructor may recommend that the student withdraw from the class.

University Excused Absences

These are addressed by the instructor or the Student Advocate and Success Specialist as described in each item. Appropriate documentation is required for each absence. The Student Advocate and Success Specialist will notify course instructors of his or her actions using the university e-mail system.

  1. University-sponsored activities. Student participation in authorized activities as an official representative of the university. Such activities include official athletic events, ROTC, student government and student organization activities, regional or national meetings or conferences when endorsed by an academic or organization faculty advisor, performances, debates, and similar activities. The Student Advocate and Success Specialist addresses these absences.
  2. Medical circumstances.
    1. A student who is briefly ill or injured with fewer than three consecutive hours of class (see (b) below), and is therefore unable to attend class, should first consult with his or her course instructor about the absence. If necessary, the instructor may refer the student to the Student Advocate and Success Specialist.
    2. The Student Advocate and Success Specialist will address absences of three or more consecutive hours of class. This includes absences of three consecutive one-hour class meetings, one three-hour class meeting, etc.
  3. Death or critical illness of an immediate family member. Immediate family is defined as parents, legal guardians, siblings, children, spouse or life partner, grandparents, and grandchildren. The Student Advocate and Success Specialist addresses these absences.
  4. Other official activities.
    1. Short-term military obligations. The Student Advocate and Success Specialist addresses these absences. Students who are subject to federal military activation are covered by a separate policy. Please consult the catalog for this policy.
    2. Jury duty, subpoenas for court appearance, religious holidays, and other official activities deemed by the Student Advocate and Success Specialist to warrant an excused absence.
  5. Extreme personal emergencies. Examples of such events include house fires, serious crimes, and other grave emergencies deemed by the Student Advocate and Success Specialist to warrant an excused absence.

Classification of Students

Classification of students is based on the number of college level credit hours earned as shown following:

Classification Semester Hours
Freshman 0-29
Sophomore 30-59
Junior 60-89
Senior 90 or more
Course Numbers Level
100-199 freshman level
200-299 sophomore level
300-499 junior and senior level
500 or above graduate level

Contact Information

Students are required to have a valid, permanent address on file with the university. Updates to this address should be made online in the Student Information section of myMU.

Students must use their official Marshall e-mail addess when communicating with university offices and faculty, unless otherwise instructed, such as for online courses.

Course Substitution

Students may apply for course substitutions or waivers to accommodate disabilities under the following policy:

Conditions

A student seeking a course substitution or waiver due to the presence of a disability must meet the following conditions:

  • Completion of the Course Substitution/Waiver Form. This form requires that the student attach a recent (within two years) diagnosis of a disability warranting a substitution or waiver. (The form is available in the Office of Disability Services, the H.E.L.P. office, the Buck Harless Student Athlete Program office, college deans’ offices, and the office of the Dean of Student Affairs.) A licensed psychologist, a licensed school psychologist, or a properly credentialed education specialist must have made the diagnosis in the case of a learning disability.
  • Verification on the Course Substitution/Waiver Form from the dean of the student’s college, upon recommendation by the faculty of the department in which the student is a major, that the course for which a substitution is requested is not an integral part of the student’s course of study. If the course is integral to the course of study the substitution or waiver request shall not go forward.

• Submission of the Course Substitution/Waiver Form to the Office of Disability Services.

The Committee

The Course Substitution Committee will consist of three faculty members. Two faculty members, appointed annually, will have expertise in areas related to disabilities and academic accommodations. The first faculty member will be the Director of the Psychology Clinic or designee. The second faculty member must have expertise related to accommodating disabilities and is appointed by the Dean of the College of Education. The third faculty member is to have expertise in the discipline of the course for which the student is applying for substitution or waiver. This faculty member will be appointed by the dean of the college that houses the discipline of the course for which the substitution/waiver is requested. The Office of Disability Services is responsible for notifying the appropriate academic dean that an appointment is necessary for the purpose of considering appropriate courses for substitution.

Procedure

Submission of the Course Substitution form to the College Dean's Office and the Dean completes their portion and sends the form to the Office of Disability Services.  The student provides the Office of Disability Services with the diagnosis documentation. If approved a letter of approval of accommodation is mailed to the dean and student.  The student will then need to meet with the associate dean to discuss the class options for accommodations. 

The Office of Disability Services confirms that a diagnosis of a disability is presented by the student and that the disability is known to hinder or prevent successful completion of the course of study for which the substitution is requested. If there is no such diagnosis the request is denied. If the appropriate diagnosis is presented the Office of Disability Services proceeds to form the committee by securing, from the appropriate academic dean, the third faculty appointment required for the Course Substitution Committee. All materials submitted by the student are forwarded to the committee members with a certification that the student has presented a diagnosis of a disability warranting a substitution. The committee is charged with identifying courses that would constitute appropriate substitution and reporting these courses to the Office of Disability Services.

A representative of the Office of Disability Services convenes the Course Substitution Committee and facilitates its work. The committee will meet up to two times a semester to address all pending requests and assign specific courses for substitution. The Office of Disability Services will report decisions to the student and include the student’s dean on all correspondence.

A student who is denied a course substitution or waiver may appeal in writing within 10 working days to the Provost/Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs, whose decision is final.

Students should be aware that a course substitution/waiver would not be valid at any other institution and would have to be approved by the new college or department if the student changes major or declares a second major at Marshall University.

Approved by Faculty Senate, January 24, 2003
Amended April 8, 2014

Credit by Examination

Course credit by examination is granted at Marshall in some academic departments. Students interested in earning credit this way should contact the chairperson of the department in which the course is offered. With the department chair’s permission, the student should obtain a “Credit by Examination” form from the Registrar. This form must be signed for approval by the department chair, the dean of the student’s college, and the Registrar. If the student is not a full-time student, he/she must also pay a $30.00 examination fee. The grade received on the special exam will be applied to the student’s transcript. Students may not use Credit by Examination to repeat a course under the D/F Repeat Rule.

Credit Hour (same as Semester Hour)

Generally a student earns one credit for each 15 hours of class contact. Classes normally meet 45 hours in a semester for 3 units of credit. Students should plan on two hours of preparation/study for each in-class hour. Laboratory classes require two or three hours of lab per week for each semester hour of credit.

D/F Repeat Rule (Repeating Courses)

If a student earns a grade of D or F (including failures due to regular and/or irregular withdrawal) on any course taken no later than the semester or summer term during which the student attempts the sixtieth semester hour, and if that student repeats this course prior to the receipt of a baccalaureate degree, the original grade shall be disregarded and the grade or grades earned (excluding a W) when the course is repeated shall be used in determining his/her Grade Point Average. The original grade shall not be deleted from the student’s record.

The D/F Repeat Rule applies only to graduation requirements and not to requirements for professional certification which may be within the province of licensure boards, external agencies, or the West Virginia Board of Education.

Adopted by West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission (Series 22)
Effective August 1, 2002.

Dead Week

The last five class days of the fall and spring semesters are designated as “dead week.” During this period, instructors cannot give exams that count as 15% or more of the final course grade. They can assign major papers and/or projects which count as 15% or more of the final course grade only if the assignment is stated in the course syllabus. Instructors can introduce new material and give make up exams during the Dead Week. Exemptions from this policy include night classes, laboratories, freshman English composition courses, and any classes meeting once a week. Dead Week is not applicable to Intersession or Summer Session.

Dean’s List (see also President's List)

Students registered for 12 or more hours of courses for which they receive letter grades, and who at the end of a semester have Grade Point Averages of 3.3 or above, are considered honor students. The names of these students make up the “Dean’s List’’ in their undergraduate college.

Degree Program

A degree program is a unified series of courses or learning experiences that lead to a degree.

Distance Education Courses

According to the Higher Education Opportunity Act, “distance education” is defined as education that uses one or more of the following technologies to deliver instruction to students who are separated from the instructor; and to support regular and substantive interaction between the students and the instructor, synchronously or asynchronously. The technologies used may include: the Internet; one way and two way transmissions through open broadcast, closed circuit, cable, microwave, broadband lines, fiber optics, satellite, or wireless communications devices; audio conferencing; or videocassettes, DVDs, and CD-Roms (PL 110–315, 14 AUG. 2008). At Marshall University, distance education courses consist of three formats: online courses, virtual courses, and hybrid courses.

Online Courses

The term “online course” refers to any distance education course in which 100% of the course content is delivered asynchronously by technological means. There are no synchronous, face-to-face, or on-site attendance requirements because online courses are the electronic versions of classes offered on the Marshall campus delivered completely over the Internet. Online courses are accessible through MUOnLine which is powered by Blackboard, a set of online course tools and supporting software. Communication between students and instructors can occur by any electronic means and there are no required on-campus or real-time meetings.

Online courses generally follow the Marshall University calendar for the term in which they are offered, but individual exceptions may apply. Students should check the syllabus for each individual class for a beginning and ending date. Students may register for online courses using myMU during the designated registration periods each term, in person at the Registrar’s Office, or by mail. Hours of enrollment are reflected in the actual term in which the student is registered. For all verification purposes, hours of enrollment are counted only in the term in which the student is registered. Note that the withdrawal period for online courses parallels that of regular courses. A student may withdraw from an individual online course through 2/3 of the official course length. After that time, only a complete withdrawal from the university is allowed. The refund policy for online courses also parallels that of regular courses.

Online courses are currently assessed a fee per credit hour for undergraduate courses regardless of residency or number of credit hours the student may be registered for in addition to the online courses. Academic and lab fees may also apply depending on college or school policies. For example, students in the College of Health Professions will still be responsible for clinical and program fees in addition to the online course fee. Likewise, students in the College of Business are still required to pay the technology fee in addition to the online course fee.

Virtual Courses

“Virtual course” refers to any course that employs technological means for live, synchronous class meetings (e.g. live video). An in-person delivery format may also be available simultaneously. Virtual courses require that students attend all class meetings at designated dates/times. Students should check the syllabus for each individual class for equipment requirements and attendance information. There is no additional fee for a virtual course, and they follow all regular university registration and withdrawal periods outlined in the academic calendar.

Hybrid Courses

“Hybrid course” refers to any distance education course in which 75% or more of the course content is delivered by technological means. There will be synchronous, face-to-face, or on-site attendance requirements described in the course syllabus that may require Internet access, a webcam and/or headset with microphone for real-time communication. Hybrid courses may also use MU OnLine and require that students attend online class meetings at designated dates/times. Students should check the syllabus for each individual class for equipment requirements and attendance information. There is no additional fee for a hybrid course and they follow all regular university registration and withdrawal periods outlined in the academic calendar. Students may register for online courses using myMU during the designated registration periods each term, in person at the Registrar’s Office, or by mail.

Double Major

Students can major in more than one discipline by completing the requirements for both majors. If the two majors are in different colleges, the student must secure permission from both college deans in order to pursue both majors. For administrative purposes, the student can only be housed in one college; this is the college of record which maintains the student’s records. The student would only complete the college requirements of the college of record. To earn dual degrees, see “Additional Baccalaureate Degrees.”

Dropping All Courses (Withdrawal from the University)

Final Date: Last Day of Class

The last date for total withdrawal from the university is the last day of class. Total Withdrawal from the university is defined as dropping all classes for which a student is currently registered. Any part-of-term courses that have ended, such as first 8-week classes, will not be dropped from the student schedule as the course has already completed.

A student who wishes to totally withdraw from the university must first secure the signature of a Total Withdrawal Counselor and then present the request to the Registrar in person, by email, or by mail. If the request is made in person, a drop form bearing the signature of a Total Withdrawal Counselor must be submitted to the Registrar’s Office. Requests by email must be sent to registrar@marshall.edu from the student’s MU email account. For mailed requests, the postmark will be the official date of withdrawal. In cases where the student is unable to secure the physical signature of a Total Withdrawal Counselor, permission may be obtained via email. A list of Total Withdrawal Counselors is provided on the Office of the Registrar website.

Grades Assigned for Withdrawal from the University

Students withdrawing from the university receive a grade of W for all courses. The W grade (withdrew) has no impact on the Grade Point Average.

Students who withdraw from the university improperly, or who do not follow the regulations described here, receive grades of F at the end of the semester or term.

Dropping Individual Courses

Final Date: Tenth Friday in a Regular Term

  • Day classes: Students can drop individual courses after the Schedule Adjustment period and during the Withdrawal period which lasts until the Friday of the tenth week of class during a regular semester. The exact last day for dropping individual courses is always published in the Academic Calendar for any given semester or term. A student must get a “Schedule Adjustment and Class Drop Form” from the Registrar’s Office, fill in the required course drop information, and then obtain the signature of the course instructor. Alternatively, an e-mail from the student’s MU e-mail address is acceptable should it contain the student’s MU ID number, the course four-digit CRN, course number (Example: ENG 101) and section number. The e-mail must be sent to the course instructor for approval and then the student must forward that instructor approval to registrar@marshall.edu.  If a student is on academic probation, he/she must also get the approval and signature of the associate dean of his/her college and bring the completed form to the Registrar’s Office.
  • E-Course Withdrawal Period: The withdrawal policy for e-courses parallels that for regular courses. A student can withdraw from an individual e-course through 2/3 of the official course length. After that time, only a complete withdrawal from the university is allowed. The refund policy for e-courses also parallels that of regular courses.
  • Night or Off-Campus classes, or E-Courses: Classes that meet 4:00 p.m .or after, off-campus, or online do not require instructor signature and may be withdrawn in person at the Office of the Registrar or by sending an e-mail from the student’s MU e-mail address and contain the student’s MU ID number, course CRN, Course number (Example: ENG 101) and section number, to registrar@marshall.edu. If a student is on academic probation he/she must have the approval signature of his/her associate dean.
  • High-demand course: If a student drops a “high-demand” course during the Withdrawal period, he/she will not be able to pre-register for the course for the following semester. High-demand courses include:
    ACC 215 Bison image Accounting Principles (CT)3
    BSC 227Human Anatomy4
    ENG 101 Bison image Beginning Composition3
    ENG 201 Bison image Advanced Composition3
    MTH 121 Bison image Concepts and Applications (CT)3
    MTH 127 Bison image College Algebra-Expanded5
    MTH 130 Bison image College Algebra3
    SPN 101Introductory Spanish3
    SPN 102Introductory Spanish II3
    Students can obtain an up-to-date listing of high-demand courses from the Office of the Registrar.

Grades Assigned for Dropping Individual Courses

A student dropping courses or withdrawing from the university during the Withdrawal period (which lasts until the tenth Friday after the first class day of the regular semester), will receive a grade of W. For eight week courses, summer sessions and other courses of varying lengths, the withdrawal period ends the Friday immediately following the two thirds point in the course. Exact withdrawal dates are published in the annual University Academic Calendar. The W grade (withdrew) has no impact on a student’s Grade Point Average.

Students who drop courses improperly, or who do not follow the regulations described here, receive a grade of F at the end of the semester or term.

Exceptions

Military Service

Men and women called to active duty in the armed services of the United States are granted full refund of fees, but no credit, if the call comes before the end of the first three fourths of the semester or term, and full credit, but no refund of fees, is granted if the call comes thereafter. However, credit is granted only in those courses in which the student is maintaining a passing grade at the time of departure to military service. The term “called to active duty” is defined as being called to active duty as the result of the federal activation of a total reserve component, National Guard unit, or any portion which involves a particular student or an individual who is a bona fide member of the reserve component or a National Guard unit. The final grades, both passing and failing, for three fourths of a semester or more are shown on the student’s permanent record. Please note: Students called to active duty should present a copy of activation orders to the Office of the Registrar to ensure proper handling of their academic records in accordance with this policy.

Medical Reasons

See "Medical/Emergency Withdrawal Policy."

Electronic Courses

See "Distance Education courses."

Final Exams

Absence from Final Exams

Students are required to take all regular examinations. If a student attends a course throughout the semester and is absent from the final examination without permission, the instructor counts the examination as zero and reports the final grade of F. If the absence is the result of illness or some other valid reason beyond the student’s control, the instructor reports a grade of I. In all cases, the student must verify the reason for the absence. (See “Incomplete’’ under Grades and Quality Points.)

Rescheduling of Final Exams

If a student has final exam conflicts or has three or more final exams scheduled for the same day, he/she should follow these steps:

  • pick up a “Final Examination Rescheduling Form” from the major department or the college office;
  • fill in the top part of the form in which he/she must show his/her complete final exam schedule;
  • take this to the dean for verification;
  • take the verified form to one of his/her class instructors and attempt to make a rescheduling agreement (date, time, place);
  • if the student and instructor reach an agreement, the instructor should sign the form, keep a copy, and send a copy to the dean of the student’s college;
  • if an agreement cannot be reached, the instructor should note this fact and sign the form. In this case, the student should try to reach an agreement with the instructor of another class in conflict;
  • if no instructors agree to reschedule and the student has all comments and signatures on the form, take the form to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs (OM 110);
  • the Provost or designee will determine if an exam should be rescheduled and if so, the time, date, and place–the student and the instructor will receive written notice of any rescheduling;
  • the Provost’s ruling can only be modified by an agreement between the instructor and the student;
  • if the student rejects a ruling by the Provost, he/she thereby agrees to take each exam at the scheduled time.

Note: the Provost will not consider any form submitted less than one week before the first day of finals, or any form that is incomplete. An instructor is not required to reschedule a final exam at the student’s request.

Full-time Student

A full-time student must carry at least 12 semester hours of undergraduate courses or a combination of 12 semester hours of undergraduate and graduate courses in a regular semester; during a five week summer term, a full-time student must carry at least 4 semester hours.

Grade Appeal

See section entitled “Academic Rights and Responsibilities of Students.”

Grade Information and Regulations

Grade Point Average Defined

A Grade Point Average (GPA) is a numeric value calculated by dividing total quality points by total credit hours attempted (courses in which a student earned a letter grade). The Grade Point Average computed for graduation purposes (not necessarily each semester), is based on all work attempted with these exceptions:

  • Courses with grades of W, I, CR/NC, and AU
  • Grades of D or F repeated under the D/F Repeat Policy
  • Developmental courses
  1. An overall Grade Point Average is a calculation based on credit earned at Marshall and all other accredited institutions of higher learning;
  2. A Marshall Grade Point Average is a calculation based on credit earned at Marshall only.

Quality Points Defined

Quality points are numeric values assigned to letter grades that allow a student to calculate a Grade Point Average (GPA). Quality points are based on these values for each semester hour of credit: A=4; B= 3; C= 2; D= 1; and F= 0. When the GPA is a 2.0, the student has neither a surplus nor a deficiency of quality points. If the GPA is below a 2.0 the student will have a deficiency of quality points (“deficit points”) resulting from excessive grades of D and/or F. Grades of A and/or B can help to earn a surplus of quality points.

GPA Calculation

The following example is provided as a guide for calculation of the GPA:

First Semester

Course Grade Quality Pts. Credit Hrs Total Quality Pts.
ENG 101 B 3 x 3 = 9
SOC 200 A 4 x 3 = 12
MTH 121 D 1 x 3 = 3
PE 115 B 3 x 1 = 3
UNI 100 CR 0 x (1) = 0
BSC 104 C 2 x 4 = 8
Total 14 35

Multiply the number of Quality Points for each grade by the number of Credit Hours for that class. Divide the total number of Quality Points for the semester (35) by the total number of Credit Hours (14). This yields a GPA of 2.50 for the semester.

Second Semester

Course Grade Quality Pts. Credit Hrs Total Quality Pts.
BSC 105 D 1 x 4 = 4
PSY 201 C 2 x 3 = 6
HST 101 F 0 x 3 = 0
CMM 103 D 1 x 3 = 3
PHL 201 C 2 x 3 = 6
Total 16 19

Multiply the number of Quality Points for each grade by the number of Credit Hours for that class. Divide the total number of Quality Points for the semester (19) by the total number of Credit Hours (16). This yields a GPA of 1.18 for the semester.

To determine this student’s cumulative GPA (the GPA for both semesters), add the total Quality Points for both semesters (54) and divide by the total Credit Hours for both semesters (30), resulting in a 1.8 GPA.

Note that this cumulative GPA is under 2.00. Since it is less than 2.00, this student has a quality point deficiency. Her college will place her on academic probation and she will remain there until future grades eliminate the deficiency.

Marshall and Overall GPA

A Marshall Grade Point Average is a calculation based on credit earned at Marshall only.

An Overall Grade Point Average is a calculation based on credit earned both at Marshall and all other accredited institutions of higher education. Both GPA’s are calculated for eligibility and graduation purposes.

Types of Grades

  • Credit/No Credit Option: A student may choose to take a maximum of 18 semester hours on a credit/no credit basis toward fulfillment of requirements of a baccalaureate degree. Credit completed through the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) or Advanced Placement, as well as approved foreign study, does not count as a part of the 18 hour limit under the CR/NC option. Students make the decision to take a course on a credit/no credit basis at the time of registration and cannot change this after the end of the Schedule Adjustment period. Courses taken CR/NC must be in areas other than the student’s major or teaching specialization, although approved foreign study courses can be taken CR/NC. (See “Study Abroad” section elsewhere in this catalog.) Some departments and colleges have additional regulations regarding CR/NC.
    A student must earn a letter grade of C or better to receive a CR grade. A grade of NC is recorded for work that would earn a letter grade of D or F. All withdrawals under the CR/NC option will receive a W grade. The CR/NC grade has no impact on the Grade Point Average.
  • Incomplete: The grade of I (incomplete) indicates that the student has completed three-quarters of the course, as determined by the instructor, but cannot complete the course for a reason that accords with the university excused-absence policy. For courses (traditional or online) that do or do not have a defined absence policy, it is determined by the instructor to issue the I grade. Students must be in good standing (for example a C grade or better) in the class prior to requesting an incomplete. The course instructor decides whether or not an incomplete will be granted and specifies in writing on the university incomplete grade form what work the student must complete to fulfill the course requirements. The student has until the end of the next fall or spring semester from the date of receipt of the incomplete grade in which to complete the course, or the instructor may establish an earlier deadline. If special circumstances exist, which prevent the student from completing the course in the prescribed time, the incomplete may be extended with the written approval of the instructor, the instructor’s chair or division head, and the instructor’s dean noting the time period for the work to be completed. If the student satisfactorily completes the course in the prescribed time he/she will receive a letter grade. If the student fails to complete the course requirements during the stipulated time, the grade of I changes to a grade of F, NC, or U, depending on the type of grade appropriate for the course. All grades remain on the student’s permanent record as originally submitted by the course instructor, except for I grades that have been completed and changed by the instructor. Any grade change is added to the permanent record.
    In the event that the faculty member leaves the institution or is no longer available, the disposition of incomplete grade or grades is the responsibility of the chair, the dean, or the provost. If the the chair is unavailable, the responsibility falls on the dean; if the dean is unavailable the responsibility goes to the provost. The decision will be made in consultation with the faculty in the appropriate discipline.
  • W (Withdrew): If a student drops courses during the Withdrawal period (which lasts until the tenth Friday after the first week of the regular semester), or withdraws completely from the university through the last day of class, he/she will receive a W. For eight week courses, summer session courses, and other courses of varying lengths, the W period ends the Friday immediately following the two thirds point in the course. Exact W dates are published in the annual University Academic Calendar. The W (withdrew) has no impact on the Grade Point Average. (Please be aware that withdrawing from a course may change a student’s status from that of full-time to part-time student—a full-time student is enrolled for 12 hours or more. Part-time status could negatively affect financial aid, athletic participation, or health insurance eligibility.)

Final Grades

Marshall University mails final grades only upon student request. Grades will be available online using myMU. Requests to have grades mailed to the permanent address in the student information system may be submitted online using myMU or by submitting a written request to the Office of the Registrar, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755. Written requests must contain name, student number, and signature of the student.

Midterm Grade Reports for Freshmen and Sophomores

Shortly before the middle of the Fall and Spring semester (around the eighth week), all faculty evaluate the freshman and sophomore students in their classes. Freshman and sophomore students who are earning the equivalent of a grade of D, F, or NC at this time will receive a grade report mailed to their permanent address and a letter explaining how they can improve their academic performance. A midterm grade is not a promise of a particular final grade nor is it recorded on the student’s official transcript. It is intended only as an early warning.

Graduation Information

Academic Requirements
A student’s college will make the final check of courses required, total earned credits, degree, and GPA requirements, as well as other university-wide requirements. To receive a baccalaureate degree from Marshall University, a student must:

  • Have a minimum of 120 credit hours (some colleges or majors require more);
  • Have an overall Grade Point Average of 2.00 or higher;
  • Have a Marshall Grade Point Average of 2.00 or higher;
  • Have an overall Grade Point Average of 2.00 or higher in the major area of study;
  • Have earned a grade of C or better in English 201 or 201H;
  • Have met all major(s) and college requirements;
  • Have met the requirements of the Core Curriculum;
  • Have met the residence requirements of Marshall University, including 12 hours of 300/400 level coursework in the student’s college (see section entitled “Residence Requirements”);
  • Be enrolled at Marshall at least one semester of the senior year;
  • Have transferred no more than 72 credit hours from an accredited West Virginia two-year institution of higher education.

Colleges and specific programs may have unique requirements that are more stringent than those noted above. Students are responsible for staying informed about and ensuring that they meet the requirements for graduation.

Application for Graduation
Students must apply for graduation at the beginning of the semester or term in which they intend to complete graduation requirements. They can complete the graduation application online through myMU prior to the posted deadline in the online Academic Calendar. Students can also complete the application through their college dean’s office. The university requires graduates to pay a diploma fee that can be paid through myMU as part of the online graduation application process or at the Bursar’s office. A receipt for this fee must accompany the application if it is submitted to the college dean’s office.

Commencement/Graduation Dates

Marshall University observes two Commencement Exercises and four graduation dates during an academic year. The official graduation dates are:

  • last day of final examinations in July;
  • last day of final examinations in August;
  • day of Commencement in December;
  • day of Commencement for the spring semester.
    Students who complete all requirements for a degree at any time other than the above dates will be graduated on the next successive date. Students will not be graduated on any dates other than those noted above. Students who are graduated at the end of summer terms are invited to attend the fall Commencement Exercises.

Honors Graduation

Baccalaureate Degree
Baccalaureate degree candidates who have achieved special distinction in academic work are recognized at Commencement Exercises. Their honor status is printed on their diplomas and transcripts. Honor status is determined by this scale for the final cumulative Grade Point Average:

  • Summa cum laude (3.85 and above)
  • Magna cum laude (3.60 to 3.84)
  • Cum laude (3.30 to 3.59)

Note: Honor calculations are not rounded.

For May graduates, honors recognition at Commencement is based on academic standing prior to the Spring term. For December graduates, honors recognition at Commencement is based on academic standing prior to the Fall term. The diploma and transcript will reflect honors standing after calculation of final grades.

Honors eligibility for transfer students (baccalaureate degree):

Transfers from in-state public institutions: Honors are calculated on the overall GPA

From a two-year college in WV state system: must have earned at least 56 hours of work at Marshall University.

From a four year institution in WV state system: must have earned a minimum of 36 hours of work at Marshall University.
Transfers from non-West Virginia public institutions: Honors are calculated on the overall and Marshall GPA

All other transfer students: must have earned at least 64 hours of work at Marshall, at least 50 percent of which must be upper division work (300/400).

Associate Degree:
Associate degree candidates for graduation who have achieved special distinction in academic work are recognized at Commencement. Their honor status is printed on their diploma. Honor status is determined by this scale for the final cumulative Grade Point Average:

With High Honors 3.70 and above

With Honors 3.30 to 3.69
Note: Honor calculations are not rounded.


Honors eligibility for transfer students (associate degree):

A transfer student must have earned at least 36 hours of work at Marshall, 32 of which must be applicable to an associate degree program and must have attained honors for all work attempted at Marshall and honors for all academic work attempted at the collegiate level regardless of the institution attended.

Residence Requirements
For all undergraduate degrees (see exceptions below), at least one year’s work in residence is required. “In residence” means to be enrolled in Marshall University courses. A “year in residence’’ comprises at least 24 hours credit earned in at least two semesters’ work in residence or one semester and two summer terms in residence. One semester must be in the senior year. Transfer students must take at least 12 hours of 300/400 level coursework in their college and at least 15 hours in their major field except for Combined College and Professional Programs.

Exceptions:

  • College of Education students must meet the college residency and teacher certification requirements.
  • Regents Bachelor of Arts Degree.
  • All students should check with their own colleges for any additional residence requirements.

Inter-College Transfer

Students who wish to transfer to another college must initiate the request in the office of their current college. Any student who is currently eligible to attend Marshall University shall be eligible to transfer from one college to another within the institution so long as he or she meets the admission requirements for the college. Students on probation are eligible to transfer if all other admission criteria are met.

Exception: Individuals who are returning to the university from one or more years of active military duty may enter the college of their choice, provided they meet that college’s entrance requirements.

Independent Study

Independent studies are tutorials, independent readings, research, problem reports, and other individualized activities designed to meet the special needs of students within their major. Independent studies are offered only at the discretion of the department chair and college dean.

Internship

An internship is a supervised, off campus work/study arrangement with external agencies or institutions. Usually a student, with faculty approval, registers for an internship course for which he or she will receive credit. Often the students are paid, but not always. They generally serve as trainees under the supervision of an individual at the off-campus site. A Marshall faculty member usually serves as a coordinator and resource person. Students may expect regular site visits from a faculty member as well as on-campus training seminars, although internship experiences will vary across departments.

Laboratory Courses

Lab courses supplement classroom courses. They are organized activities involving the observation and verification of experiments and experimental techniques. Laboratory courses require two or three hours of lab per week for each semester hour of credit.

Major

A major is a program of study requiring at least 24 semester credits for completion. It is offered within one department or by a combination of departments. It is a field of study within an approved degree program, having its own curriculum. A degree program may have more than one major. All courses in the major must be taken for a grade except internships, practica, and approved study abroad courses.

Medical/Emergency Withdrawal Policy

A student may request and be considered for a medical or emergency withdrawal when extraordinary circumstances, such as a serious illness, injury, or catastrophic situation prevents the student from continuing classes. The policy covers physical and mental health, as well as life-changing difficulties

A medical/emergency withdrawal from the university will constitute a full withdrawal from all academic classes for the requested semester, with the exception of those classes whose completion dates occurred prior to the withdrawal. Refund of tuition and fees will be a separate determination, as will eligibility for future financial aid. These decisions will follow policies, guidelines and schedules set forth by the university and state and federal government.

If a student is currently enrolled, consideration should be given to withdrawing from those courses through the regular process prior to requesting a medical/emergency withdrawal.

A request for a medical/emergency withdrawal must be filed within six months of the end of the semester involved unless the student can provide rationale and documentation to show that it was not possible to make the request within this timeframe. Students may apply for a medical/emergency withdrawal by following the guidelines provided below. Application for a medical/emergency withdrawal does not guarantee that a withdrawal will be granted. All requests are evaluated on an individual basis.

All students requesting a medical/emergency withdrawal submit a complete packet of information to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs. The packet must include:

  1. Completed Request for medical/emergency withdrawal in the form of a typed, signed letter, or e-mail from the student’s Marshall e-mail account, explaining how the illness, condition, or situation affected their ability to maintain their status as a student at the university and why withdrawing from courses through the regular process is/was not an option for them. The request must also include the student’s Marshall ID number and mailing address. Incomplete grades in courses may be arranged in compliance with university policy, and may be an option for students to consider instead of a medical/emergency withdrawal.
  2. For medical withdrawal: Typed letter from the student’s treating physician(s) recommending a withdrawal for medical reasons. The letter must state the specific rationale for the recommendation, including diagnosis or medical impressions; why the illness or condition prevented the student from maintaining their status as a student at the university; the effective date of the onset of the illness or condition; dates of treatment; and anticipated date of resolution, if applicable. The letter must be on official letterhead and must be signed by the service provider. The letter may be faxed from the treatment provider’s fax machine. Medical information will be kept confidential.
    For withdrawal due to catastrophic event: Documentation sufficient to support the student’s claim of involvement in a catastrophic situation. Said documentation will vary depending on the situation and should follow guidelines set forth by the Associate Dean of Student Affairs.
    A request for a medical/emergency withdrawal without the supporting rationale will not be considered.
  3. Complete Medical/Emergency Withdrawal Consultation Form, Financial Aid.
  4. Complete Medical/Emergency withdrawal Consultation Form, Residence Services (if applicable)
  5. Complete Medical/Emergency withdrawal Consultation Form, International Students (if applicable)
  6. Other relevant supporting documentation as needed.

If the withdrawal is granted, the student will be unable to register for classes until he or she provides the Office of Student Affairs with a letter from their health care provider(s) (in the case of a medical withdrawal) releasing the student to return to the university and outlining the student’s sufficient ability to manage coursework at Marshall. In the case of a catastrophic event, the student must provide a written statement that outlines the satisfactory resolution of the negative impact of the event.

The Office of Student Affairs will send a notice to the student regarding the outcome of the medical/emergency withdrawal request.

Approved by Faculty Senate, January 24, 2017

Minors

A minor is a program of study outside the major department requiring at least 12 semester credit hours for completion. All courses in the minor must be taken for a grade except for approved study abroad courses. With the exception of college-approved interdisciplinary minors, each academic department/division designates the specific courses or range of courses required for each minor it offers. Please consult the department description in the catalog for requirements.

myMU

myMU is a campus portal for students using the Marshall University website. Using the portal, students can access a number of online services quickly, including registering for classes and checking schedules and grades. To use myMU, a student must know his or her MUNET username and password. Students on academic probation, or who have any other kind of registration hold, cannot register via myMU. For instructions on how to use myMU, visit www.marshall.edu/myMU.

Placement Examinations

Required prerequisites for math courses vary based on the individual course. The prerequisite for each course is noted in the Courses A-Z section in this catalog. Students who do not meet the prerequisites for their required math course may challenge their placement by taking an exam administered by University College in Smith Communications Building, Room 212. To schedule an exam and obtain information to prepare for the exam, please call 304-696-3169 or visit the University College website at www.marshall.edu/uc.

Plagiarism (see Academic Dishonesty)

Practicum

This is a closely supervised experience in a student’s professional area. It may be on or off campus, or at a combination of the two. Ordinarily, there is extensive collaboration with a faculty supervisor. With faculty approval, a student registers for a practicum for which he or she will receive credit. Practicum experiences vary across departments.

President's List (see also Dean's List)

Students registered for 12 or more hours of courses for which they receive letter grades, and who at the end of a semester have Grade Point Averages of 4.00, are considered high honor students. The names of these students make up the “President’s List’’ at Marshall University.

Readmission to the University

Former students not enrolled at Marshall University for one year or longer must apply for readmission. Readmission decisions are based on the student’s academic standing at Marshall University. If eligible to return, former students will be readmitted to the college of last enrollment. Graduates of bachelor’s degree programs will be readmitted to a post-baccalaureate major pending selection of a new major or degree program. The readmission application is available at the Admissions office or online at www.marshall.edu/admissions.

If a student previously attended Marshall and subsequently attended another institution, he/she must apply to Marshall as a transfer student.

Repeating Courses

Credits for a repeated course may not be used to fulfill the credit hour requirements for graduation. Exceptions: courses repeated under the D/F Repeat Rule, approved Special Topics courses, internships, practica, and other approved courses in departments such as Music. Students should check with their college dean for a list of all exemptions.

Residence

“In residence” means to be enrolled in Marshall University courses.

Semester Hour

Same as “Credit Hour.”

Schedule Adjustment

Students can change their class schedules during the late registration and schedule adjustment period each term. The exact schedule adjustment period for any semester or term is published in the academic calendar for that semester or term. Schedule changes can be made on www.marshall.edu/myMU, or in person at the Registrar’s Office. If a student wants to change sections of a course during the schedule adjustment period, he/she must drop the section in which he/she is currently enrolled and add the new section.

See section entitled “Dropping Courses” for information on dropping a class after the schedule adjustment period.

Semester Load

To make normal progress toward graduation, students should complete approximately 30 to 34 semester hours during a calendar year, which includes Fall, Spring and Summer terms. If students want to take 19 or more credit hours during Fall or Spring term, or 7 or more hours during a regular Summer term, they must obtain permission of the dean of their college.

Seminar

A seminar is a small class, usually offered at the junior/senior level, which may be involved in advanced study or original research.

Special Topics

Special Topics are experimental courses that can be offered twice by a department without formal committee approval. No more than 6 credits of special topics can be applied toward an associate degree; no more than 12 can be applied toward a baccalaureate degree.

Summer School

Marshall offers four summer sessions:

  • Intersession: 4 weeks
  • Summer 1: 12 weeks
  • Summer 2: 5 weeks
  • Summer 3: 5 weeks

Exact dates for each term are available on the registrar’s website at www.marshall.edu/registrar.

Admission requirements for Summer School are the same as for the regular semester. Summer offerings, which include undergraduate and graduate courses, vary from year to year. Registration for Summer School usually begins in March.

Syllabus Policy

On the first day of class, instructors must provide each student a copy of the course requirements which includes these items:

  • Course name and number.
  • Instructor’s name, office location, phone, e-mail address and office hours.
  • List of all required texts.
  • Attendance policy.
  • Grading policy.
  • Due dates for major projects and exams.
  • Course description from most recent catalog
  • Course student learning outcomes.
  • Schedule of class sessions and assignments.
  • Grid showing how each course student learning outcome will be practiced, and assessed, in the course.
  • Link to Official University Policies located on the Academic Affairs website.
  • Semester course meets, e.g., Spring 2012
  • Time course meets, e.g. M/W/F 1:00-1:50 p.m.
  • Course location.

Exceptions to this policy might include thesis, seminar, problem report, independent study, field work, internships, and medical clerkships. Colleges may develop more detailed requirements concerning the content of the syllabus.

Adopted by Marshall University Board of Governors, March 8, 2006.

Transcript

Official transcripts cost $10.00 per paper copy and $12.00 per electronic copy. The Office of the Registrar will process transcript requests within 1-2 business days of receipt. Processing time may be extended at the end of a term due to posting grades and degrees. Students with outstanding financial, social or other obligations to the university forfeit rights to an official or unofficial transcript until the obligations are resolved.

Requests for official transcripts must be sent directly to the Office of the Registrar. Requests for official transcripts can be completed at www.marshall.edu/registrar , faxed, or made in person at the Office of the Registrar.

Students may obtain unofficial transcripts at no cost in the registrar’s office or the college dean’s office. Unofficial transcripts also may be accessed using the university’s online self-service portal, myMU.

Students may obtain unofficial transcripts at no cost in the registrar’s office or the college dean’s office. Unofficial transcripts also may be accessed using the university’s online self-service portal, myMU.

Transfer Credit

  • New Students:
    When a student applies for admission to Marshall University, the Admissions office will determine the acceptability of credits earned at other institutions.
  • Enrolled Students:
    After enrollment as a regular undergraduate at Marshall, if a student plans to take courses at another institution he/she must have prior approval from the dean of his/her college if the student wants those courses to count towards his/her degree requirements at Marshall. The student should pick up an off-campus form (“Approval of Courses to be Taken for Advanced Standing”) from the Office of Admissions or his/her college office. After filling in the name of the visiting institution as well as the exact courses the student wishes to take there, the student takes the form to the Office of Admissions. The Admissions staff will convert the proposed coursework into equivalent Marshall courses and will then send the form to the student’s college office for review. The associate dean will approve the application if the proposed courses are appropriate for the student’s degree requirements. The form is then forwarded to the Registrar. The Registrar will send the student a copy of the completed form.
  • Courses students take without prior approval may be rejected when they are evaluated for degree requirements.
  • Before the credit earned at another institution can be transferred and recorded on the permanent academic record at Marshall, the student must have an official transcript forwarded from the other institution to the Marshall Office of Admissions.
  • Coursework taken at another institution transfers at the level at which it was taken. This is something important to consider because undergraduate degree students must have a minimum number of hours of upper division credit to graduate. The exact number of required upper division hours is determined by the student’s college.
  • Grades earned for coursework taken at other institutions are computed into the overall GPA, (includes courses taken at MU and other institutions), but have no impact on the Marshall GPA (except grades earned under the D/F Repeat Rule).
  • Courses taken through the Study Abroad office require a different form and process. Please see the Study Abroad section of this catalog.

Appeal of Denial of Transfer Credit, or Course Equivalency Determination, or Course Substitution

Students may appeal decisions on how transfer credits are evaluated.

The MU Undergraduate Office of Admissions determines transferability of credits and course equivalency at the time of admission. Once admitted, if a student believes the proper equivalent credit has not been awarded, the student should request, in writing, an explanation of credit denial from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. This initial step must be taken within thirty (30) days of receipt of the transfer credit evaluation or within ten (10) instructional days of the beginning of the student’s matriculating term, whichever comes first. The Office of Undergraduate Admissions will review the request for technical errors and issue a written response within ten (10) days.

The college in which the student’s degree program is housed determines course substitutions. After receiving the transfer credit evaluation from the Office of Admissions, the student should meet with an academic advisor in the student’s degree program to determine the extent to which transferred credits and course equivalencies meet specific degree requirements. At this point, the advisor may make certain additional course substitutions per the policies of the college that houses the student’s degree program.

If the student is not satisfied with the determinations in Step 2 regarding course substitutions, the student may initiate a formal appeal, in writing, to the dean of the academic college in which the student is admitted. The appeal must include applicable syllabi and other supporting documents and must be submitted within thirty (30) days of the beginning of the student’s matriculating term.

If a course substitution is not granted by the dean, the student may appeal the decision to the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, in writing, within ten (10) days of the issuance of the dean’s decision. The Commission will review the entire case, including both course equivalencies and course substitutions, and issue a recommendation to the Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at Marshall University, who shall then render the final decision.

Higher Education Policy Commission Policy on The Transferability of Undergraduate Credits and Grades

  1. Undergraduate level credits and grades earned at any public institution under the Higher Education Policy Commission shall generally be transferable to any other such institution.
  2. At least 64 and no more than 72 hours of credits and grades completed at community colleges or branch colleges in the West Virginia state system of higher education shall be transferable to any baccalaureate degree-granting institution in the state system.
  3. All grades earned for college credit work within the state system shall be counted for purposes of graduation with honors, and transfer students from within the state system shall be treated the same for this purpose as generic students.
  4. With the exception of those enrolling in specialized four year programs which have demonstrable and bona fide externally imposed requirements making such a goal impossible, students completing two year associate degrees at public institutions under the Higher Education Policy Commission shall generally, upon transfer to a baccalaureate level degree granting institution, have junior level status and be able to graduate with the same number of total credit hours as a non-transfer student at the same institution and in the same program. An exception may exist in any instance where the associate degree is a technical type designed for terminal career purposes and the general education component is substantially of a markedly different nature than that required for a student at the same two year institution enrolled in a college transfer associate degree program. Credit hours taken in general education toward associate degrees will count toward the total number of general education credit hours required at the baccalaureate degree granting institution.
  5. There shall be developed and maintained specific detailed articulation agreements between appropriate institutions in the state system. Particularly community colleges, community college components, and branch colleges will indicate clearly in catalogs and other official materials which courses are not necessarily transferable for major programs or other specific purposes to those institutions where significant numbers of students traditionally transfer; any such course(s), however, will be transferred as elective credit up to the maximum herein required.
  6. A statewide Ad Hoc Articulation Council appointed by the Chancellor consisting of two (including at least one faculty member) representatives from free standing components and branch colleges, two (including at least one faculty member) representatives from baccalaureate degree granting institutions, the Chairman of the Advisory Council of Students or his representative, and two representatives from the Higher Education Policy Commission staff shall be convened as a facilitating body in cases of disagreements between institutions over the transfer of credit. This Council will make a report and a recommendation to the Chancellor.
  7. Consistent with provisions above, each baccalaureate degree granting institution may require transfer students to meet any of the following standards:
    1. An average of C on previous work attempted and the required Grade Point Average for admission to a particular program.
    2. The completion of 36 or more additional hours of credit in residence, regardless of the number of hours transferable.
    3. The completion of 16 of the last 32 hours before graduation in residence.

Any policies of this Board contrary to the foregoing are rescinded.

Adopted: West Virginia Board of Regents July 10, 1979
Board of Trustees policy effective July 1, 1989
Higher Education Policy Commission policy effective June 22, 2003

Undergraduate Students in Graduate Courses

A senior with an overall GPA of 2.75 or better can apply to take courses at the graduate level (500/600). A student should pick up an application in the office of the Graduate College (OM 113) or in the Office of Admissions and Records in South Charleston. The application requires the recommendation of the student’s major department chairperson, college dean, and the dean of the Graduate College. A completed application must be on file in the Graduate College office before the opening of the term of enrollment. Seniors can apply credit for graduate courses either to an undergraduate or a graduate degree at Marshall, but not to both, with the exception of the 3+2 Program in the College of Business. The grades a senior may earn in a graduate course taken for undergraduate credit are included in the computation of the student’s undergraduate GPA.

Students should be aware that Marshall University’s Graduate College has established a limit on the number of credit hours earned as an undergraduate that can be applied to a graduate degree. Other institutions may have similar limits.

UNI 100: Freshman First Class (1 Credit Hour; Graded)

UNI 100 Freshman First Class is made up of two parts:

  1. the seminars and group sessions that are part of the Week of Welcome (WOW); and
  2. additional weekly, 1-hour seminars for the first eight weeks of the semester.

Successful completion of this course earns one credit hour of elective credit. The course is graded. To earn the one hour of elective credit, attendance at WOW seminars, group sessions and seminars is required along with successful completion of course activities and assignments. Students are encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity to learn about Marshall University, college-level expectations and student success. (See also “Week of Welcome,” which follows.)

Week of Welcome (WOW)

Week of Welcome is an opportunity for freshmen to familiarize themselves with the Huntington campus and learn what it means to be a student at Marshall University. Arriving on campus a few days early, freshmen participate in the President’s Freshman Convocation and sessions with the dean, faculty and staff of their academic college along with large group sessions and small group seminars. Week of Welcome (WOW) is an integral part of Freshman First Class (UNI 100 Freshman First Class), an introduction to academic structures and expectations of college life. (See above.) Week of Welcome includes optional evening activities and social events for both residential and commuter students. Information about Week of Welcome is available at www.marshall.edu/wow.