Academic Requirements and Regulations

Academic Appeals

See Academic Rights and Responsibilities of Students.

Academic Common Market

Out-of-State Programs at Reduced Tuition

West Virginia residents can pursue academic programs not available within the state through the Academic Common Market (ACM) and through contract programs. Both programs enable West Virginians to enter out of state institutions at reduced tuition rates. Contract programs have been established for study in veterinary medicine, optometry, architecture, and podiatry. ACM provides access to both baccalaureate and graduate programs not otherwise available in West Virginia. The programs are restricted to West Virginia residents who have been accepted for admission to one of the specific programs at designated out of state institutions. For information please contact the Office of Academic Affairs, Old Main 200, (304-696-6690) or The Higher Education Policy Commission. Out-of-state students who have been granted Academic Common Market access to Marshall University should follow the Academic Common Market Procedures available at www.marshall.edu/academic-affairs.

Academic Dishonesty

Introduction

As described in the Marshall University Creed, Marshall University is an “Ethical Community reflecting honesty, integrity and fairness in both academic and extracurricular activities.”

Academic Dishonesty is something that will not be tolerated as these actions are fundamentally opposed to “assuring the integrity of the curriculum through the maintenance of rigorous standards and high expectations for student learning and performance” as described in Marshall University’s Statement of Philosophy.

A student, by voluntarily accepting admission to the institution or enrolling in a class or course of study offered by Marshall University accepts the academic requirements and criteria of the institution. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of policies regulating academic conduct, including the definitions of academic dishonesty, the possible sanctions and the appeal process.

For the purposes of this policy, an academic exercise is defined as any assignment, whether graded or ungraded, that is given in an academic course or must be completed toward the completion of degree or certification requirements. This includes, but is not limited to: Exams, quizzes, papers, oral presentations, data gathering and analysis, practica and creative work of any kind.

Definitions of Academic Dishonesty

Below are definitions of some common types of academic dishonesty. Each instructor may modify the general definition of academic dishonesty to fit the immediate academic needs within that particular course of study, provided the instructor defines, in writing and preferably in the course syllabus, the details of any departure from the general definition.

  • Cheating: Any action which if known to the instructor in the course of study would be prohibited. This includes:
    • The unauthorized use of any materials, notes, sources of information, study aids or tools during an academic exercise.
    • The unauthorized assistance of a person other than the course instructor during an academic exercise.
    • The unauthorized viewing of another person’s work during an academic exercise.
    • The unauthorized securing of all or any part of assignments or examinations, in advance of submission by the instructor.
  • Fabrication/Falsification: The unauthorized invention or alteration of any information, citation, data or means of verification in an academic exercise, official correspondence or a university record.
  • Plagiarism: Submitting as one’s own work or creation any material or an idea wholly or in part created by another. This includes:
    • Oral, written and graphical material.
    • Both published and unpublished work.
    • It is the student’s responsibility to clearly distinguish his/her own work from that created by others. This includes the proper use of quotation marks, paraphrasing and the citation of the original source. Students are responsible for both intentional and unintentional acts of plagiarism.
  • Bribes/Favors/Threats: Attempting to unfairly influence a course grade or the satisfaction of degree requirements through any of these actions is prohibited.
  • Complicity: Helping or attempting to help someone commit an act of academic dishonesty

Sanctions

Sanctions for academic dishonesty may be imposed by the instructor of the course, the department chairperson, or the Academic Dean. Sanctions for academic dishonesty may be imposed even if a student withdraws from an individual course or from the university entirely. The instructor may impose the following sanctions:

  • A lower or failing project/paper/test grade;
  •  A lower final grade;
  • Failure of the course;
  • Exclusion from further participation in the class (including laboratories or clinical experiences).

The following sanctions may be recommended by the instructor but will need to be imposed by the department chair, academic dean or the Office of Academic Affairs:

  • Exclusion from an academic program;
  • Academic probation for up to 1 year;
  • Academic suspension for up to 1 year;
  • Dismissal from the university.

In those cases in which the offense is particularly flagrant or where there are other aggravating circumstances, additional, non-academic, sanctions may be pursued through the Office of Judicial Affairs. A student will be informed in writing, by the instructor or responsible office, of any charges and subsequent sanctions imposed for academic dishonesty (See “Reporting” below). Written notification of academic dishonesty charges (and the inclusion of confirmed charges/sanctions in a student’s records) is designed to inform a student of the potential repercussions of repeat offenses and his/her rights of appeal.

If a student believes that charges of academic dishonesty have been erroneously levied, he/she should appeal such charges in accordance with the process outlined in the following section, “Administrative Steps for Appealing a Final Grade or an Action Based on Academic Performance or Dishonesty.”

Sanctions for repeated academic dishonesty offenses will be imposed by the Office of Academic Affairs after consultation with the appropriate department chairs and deans. A student’s record of academic dishonesty offenses will be maintained throughout his/her enrollment at Marshall University, and the period of time between offenses may have no impact on sanctions for repeated offenses.

A student with a second academic dishonesty offense during his/her enrollment at Marshall University will be academically suspended for a period of time not to exceed one academic year (to include summer terms).

A student with a third academic dishonesty offense during his/her enrollment at Marshall University will be dismissed from the university.

Reporting

Any time an accusation of academic dishonesty is reported to the Office of Academic Affairs, and a sanction imposed (or a sanction will be imposed with the submission of final grades), a notice should be sent to the Office of Academic Affairs within ten (10) days of the accusation.

Notice of an act of academic dishonesty will be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs through the completion of an “Academic Dishonesty Report Form.” The “Academic Dishonesty Report Form” will include:

  • Instructor’s Name
  • Course Information (Term, Number, Section)
  • Student’s Name
  • Student’s University Identification Number
  • Brief Description of the Charge
  • Date of Accusation
  • Brief Description of the Sanction

Instructors are encouraged to give a copy of the “Academic Dishonesty Report Form” to a student accused of an offense. However, within ten (10) days of receipt of the “Academic Dishonesty Report Form” the Office of Academic Affairs will inform the student and the student’s dean of the accusations made, the sanctions prescribed, the repercussions of repeat offenses, and his/her rights of appeal. A copy of the report will go into the student’s college file.

Any subsequent actions taken (additional sanctions imposed, the lessening of sanctions, the withdrawal of accusations, the results of appeals, etc.) should be reported to the Office of Academic Affairs within ten (10) days of the action.

Recording

The Office of Academic Affairs will maintain a file of academic dishonesty incidents. These will be reported in summary form (no student or faculty names will be included) to the Academic Deans and the Faculty Senate at the end of each academic year.

Administrative Steps for Appealing a Course Grade or an Action Based on Academic Performance or Dishonesty

This section presents the process for students wishing to appeal a course grade, dismissal or sanction based on academic performance or conduct, or charge of academic dishonesty. For other complaints, please see the Administrative Steps for Filing a Complaint section.

The following is a guide designed to help students and faculty follow the appeals process as specified in this section of the Graduate Catalog. Students and faculty should also review the policy to ensure understanding of the scope of the appeals, materials required, and rules governing the appeals process.

Course Grade Appeals

Students may only appeal the final course grade, not grades for individual assignments. Moreover, course grades may be appealed only under the following conditions:

  1. The grade assigned for a course reflects an error in calculation or reporting (e.g., a computational error, oversight of submitted materials, or posting the wrong grade);
  2. Standards different from those established in the written department or Graduate College policies, if specific policies exist, were used in assigning the grade;
  3. The instructor departed from his or her previously articulated, written standards, without notifying graduate students, in determining the grade.

Step 1) Attempt to resolve the matter informally: Within ten (10) days of receiving a final grade the student should contact the instructor to review the grade. The instructor will respond in writing within ten (10) days of meeting with the student. The student may contact the director/coordinator of the graduate program should the instructor not be available or extraordinary circumstances require urgent action.

Step 2) Submit Course Grade Appeal (located online at www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-student-appeals) to the department/unit head of the department: Within 14 days of receiving notification from Step 1, submit Course Grade Appeal to the department/unit head in which the grade was issued and the instructor’s response. Note that Course Grade Appeal lists all materials to be submitted by the student. If the department /unit head was the instructor, submit the materials to the director of graduate studies. The department/unit head will respond in writing within ten (10) of receiving Course Grade Appeal and required materials.

Step 3) Submit Course Grade Appeal to the Graduate College Dean: Submit Course Grade Appeal, required materials, and the responses of the instructor and department/unit head to the Dean of the Graduate College. The Dean of the Graduate College will issue a final non-appealable decision within ten (10) days of receiving Form A and required materials.

Action Based on Academic Performance or Dishonesty Appeals

Students may appeal their dismissal from an academic program, sanction from an academic program based on the student’s academic performance or conduct, or finding of academic dishonesty.

Step 1) Attempt to resolve the matter informally: Contact the director/coordinator of graduate studies or department/unit head to review the action taken.

Step 2) Submit Performance Appeal form (located online at www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-student-appeals) to the Graduate College Dean: Within thirty (30) days of receiving notification of the action, submit Performance Appeal and relevant documents to the Dean of the Graduate College. The Dean of the Graduate College will respond within ten (10) days in writing to the student and official issuing the action.

Step 3) Request a hearing of the Graduate Council: Submit the response from Step 2, which will include the Graduate College Dean’s Response, to the Graduate College Dean and request a hearing of the Graduate Council. The Graduate Dean will forward all materials to the chair of the Graduate Council, who will then form a subcommittee of no fewer than three members of the Graduate Council. The subcommittee will schedule a hearing and give all parties ten (10) days written notice of the hearing time and location.

Step 4) Hearing of the facts: The members of the subcommittee will review all materials and allow the graduate student and the identified official the opportunity to review and respond to all evidence as described in official policy. Within ten (10) days of the hearing, the subcommittee will issue a written response within the Performance Appeal and send copies to the student, identified official, and the Provost.

Step 5) Request review of decision from Provost: Within ten (10) days of receiving the response from Step 4, send a written request to the Provost requesting review of the decision. The Provost’s decision shall be final.

Concerns About the Operation of an Academic Program, Academic Department, College, or University Office

The faculty, staff, and administration want all students to have a rewarding experience as they pursue their education. Students who have concerns or complaints regarding the operation of an academic program, academic department, college, or university office, should contact the appropriate director, head, or dean. The university’s directory lists the leadership of each office.

Please refer to the Administrative Steps for Appealing a Course Grade or an Action Based on Academic Performance or Dishonesty for the process to appeal a course grade, dismissal from a program, or charge of academic dishonesty.

Academic Dismissal

Academic Dismissal is termination of student status, including any right or privilege to receive some benefit, recognition, or certification. A student may be academically dismissed from a program and remain eligible to enroll in courses in other programs at Marshall University; or a student may be academically dismissed from the institution and become ineligible to enroll in other courses or programs at Marshall University. The terms of academic dismissal from a program for academic deficiency shall be determined, defined, and published by each academic program. Academic dismissal from a program or from the university may also be imposed for violation of the university policy on academic dishonesty. For additional details, see “Academic Rights and Responsibilities” and the departmental program requirements. A student may also be dismissed if he or she has not completed the degree within seven years and has not been enrolled during the most recent year. For additional details, see “Time Limitation for Master’s and Ed.S. Degrees.”

Academic Probation

Any student who has less than a 3.0 GPA either overall or in his or her current major will be placed on academic probation by the Graduate Dean. Following notification of probation and prior to subsequent registration, students will be counseled by their advisor or the department chair. During this session, the student will be advised of his or her deficiencies and the requirements for removing the deficiencies within the next nine semester hours of enrollment. Students may repeat courses for which they earned a low grade. Please review Repeating Courses for more information. The student will not be permitted to register without the written approval of the Dean of the Graduate College or the Dean of the College Education and Professional Development. A second counseling session will follow the first semester or term of subsequent enrollment and will be a review of the student’s progress. If probationary status is not removed within a satisfactory time period, the Dean of the Graduate College in consultation with the graduate department will determine if the student is to be retained or recommended for dismissal and what counseling or remediation steps will be required of the student as a condition of retention.

Medical and Pharmacy Students

Medical School and School of Pharmacy students should consult the appropriate publications of their schools for the description of this sanction.

Academic Progress

Graduate students may enroll in a minimum of 9 and maximum of 12 hours to be considered as enrolled full time. A minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0 is required to be in Good Academic Standing. Therefore, a full-time graduate student is required to complete a minimum of 9 hours with a 3.0 or higher GPA for normal academic progress.

Academic Rights and Responsibilities of Students

(from Board of Governors Policy SA-2)

The institution and its constituent colleges and schools shall define and promulgate, consistent with the policies, rules and regulations of the Higher Education Policy Commission and the Marshall University Board of Governors, the academic requirements for admission to the institution, for admission to limited enrollment programs and for admission to professional and graduate degree programs (where offered); the criteria for maintenance of satisfactory academic progress, for the successful completion of the program, for the award of a degree or certification, for graduation; the requirements or criteria for any other academic endeavor; and the requirements for student honesty and originality of expression.

A student, by voluntarily accepting admission to the institution or enrolling in a class or course of study offered by the institution, accepts the academic requirements and criteria of the institution. It is the student’s responsibility to fulfill coursework and degree or certificate requirements and to know and meet criteria for satisfactory academic progress and completion of the program.

Academic Rights

Concomitant with the academic standards and responsibilities established pursuant to these rules, each student shall have the following academic rights:

  • The student shall be graded or have his/her performance evaluated solely upon performance in the course work as measured against academic standards. The student shall not be evaluated prejudicially, capriciously, or arbitrarily. The student shall not be graded nor shall his/her performance be evaluated on the basis of his/her race, color, creed, sex or national origin.
  • Each student shall have the right to have any academic penalty, as set out in Section 4.2 of these rules below and more specifically defined by his/her institution, reviewed.
  • Each student shall have access to a copy of the college or university catalog or program brochure in which current academic program requirements are described (e.g., required courses, total credit requirements, time in residence requirements, special program requirements, minimum grade point average, probation standards, professional standards, etc.). Students have the right to receive from the instructor written descriptions of content and requirements for any course in which they are enrolled (e.g., attendance expectations, special requirements, laboratory requirements including time, field trips and costs, grading standards and procedures, professional standards, etc.).
  • The instructor of each course is responsible for assigning grades to students enrolled in the course, consistent with the academic rights set out in the preceding sections.

Application of Policy to Students

Student — any person who has been admitted to an institution to pursue a course of study, research, or service, who is currently engaged in an institutionally sponsored activity, and who has some right or privilege to be on the campus or in the facilities of the institution, or to use the same, in connection with study, research, or service, or who yet has some right or privilege to receive some benefit or recognition or certification from the institution, under the rules, regulations, or policies of the Higher Education Policy Commission, the Marshall University Board of Governors or the institution.

A student, as defined in this policy, shall be subject to any applicable penalties for failure to comply with the academic requirements and standards promulgated by the institution and/or its constituent colleges and schools according to these rules. Students are expected to adhere to these academic standards in all academic settings, classrooms, laboratories, clinics and any other activities which are part of academic requirements.

Academic Requirements and Consequences of Failure to Meet Requirements

The institution and its constituent colleges and schools shall define and promulgate the academic requirements, criteria and standards as set out in these rules. Normally, students may finish a program of study according to the requirements under which they were admitted to the program. However, requirements are subject to change at any time, with reasonable notice provided to the students.

A student who fails to meet the academic requirements or standards, including those for academic honesty as defined by the institution and its constituent colleges and schools according to Section 2.1 of these rules, may be subject to one or more of the following penalties:

  • A lower grade or failure of the course or exclusion from further participation in the class (including laboratories or clinical experiences), all of which may be imposed by the instructor.
  • Academic probation as determined and defined by the institution and its constituent colleges and schools.
  • Academic suspension as determined and defined by the institution and its constituent colleges and schools.
  • Academic dismissal.

Academic dismissal is defined as termination of student status, including any right or privilege to receive some benefit or recognition or certification. A student may be academically dismissed from a limited enrollment program and remain eligible to enroll in courses in other programs at the institution, or a student may be academically dismissed from the institution and not remain eligible to enroll in other courses or programs at the institution.

A student may appeal any penalty according to the procedures below. Each institution and its constituent colleges and schools shall determine and specify the point at which penalties, excluding those specified in these rules, may be imposed. Each instructor determines the point at which the penalties specified may be imposed. Each institution and its constituent colleges and schools shall determine the method(s), if any, by which a student may correct the condition(s) leading to imposition of these penalties and thereby have them removed.

Appeals

Each institution and its constituent colleges and schools shall establish policies and procedures by which a student may appeal or challenge any academic penalties imposed by a faculty member or by the institution or one (1) of its constituent colleges and schools, including those described in these rules.

Additional procedures may include but not be limited to:

  • Appeals of a grade penalty or exclusion from class;
  • Appeals of final course grades;
  • Appeals of imposition of academic probation;
  • Appeals of imposition of academic suspension;
  • Appeals of dismissal from undergraduate programs;
  • Appeals of dismissal from graduate programs;
  • Appeals of dismissal from professional degree programs; and
  • Appeals of dismissal from the institution.

Policies and procedures relating to appeals of academic penalties shall be governed by due process and shall include, as a minimum:

  • Written notice to the student
    1. of his/her failure to meet or maintain an academic standard,
    2. of the methods, if any, by which the student may correct the failure, and
    3. of the penalty which may be imposed.
  • An opportunity for the student to meet with the faculty member(s) or other individual(s) who have judged his/her performance to be deficient, to discuss with these faculty member(s) or other individual(s) the information forming the basis of the judgment or opinion of his/her performance, to present information or evidence on his/her behalf, and to be accompanied at any such meeting by an advisor of his/her choice from the institution. Such advisors may consult with but may not speak on behalf of their advisees or otherwise participate directly in the proceedings, unless they are given specific permission to do so by the individual or committee conducting the appeal.
  • An opportunity for the student to appeal the decision or judgment of faculty members through the established institutional appeals procedure within thirty (30) calendar days after written notice of the decision or judgment.
  • The appeal to the appropriate academic officer or appeals committee is not adversarial in nature; the formal rules of evidence do not apply.
  • An opportunity to appeal to the president of the institution or his/her designee within thirty (30) calendar days after the receipt of written notice of the decision or judgment.
  • The decision of the president or his/her designee regarding an academic appeal is final.

Policies and procedures relating to appeals of academic dismissal shall be governed by due process and shall include, as minimum in addition to the requirements of the rules above:

  • The student may be advised by a person of his/her choice; likewise, the faculty member, academic officer, or committee recommending academic dismissal may have an advisor.
  • Witnesses may be called by any of the parties involved.
  • A record of the appeal shall be prepared in the form of summary minutes and relevant attachments and will be provided to the student upon request.
  • The process for Graduate Student Appeals is further set forth in Administrative Procedure, Student-1, Graduate Student Appeals Process.
  • The decision of the president or his/her designee regarding academic dismissal is final.

Publication

All standards, criteria and procedures of the institution shall be published in one or more appropriate institutional publications such as catalogs, student handbooks, academic pamphlets, and handouts. Such requirements are subject to change with reasonable notice provided to the students.

Revised by Marshall University Board of Governors
July 12, 2013

Accelerated Graduate Degree Options

Marshall University offers an accelerated path through a number of its master’s degree programs. We encourage qualified undergraduates to participate in an Accelerated Graduate Degree (AGD) option, as it allow them to complete the requirements for the baccalaureate and graduate degree in less time and at lower cost.

Undergraduates accepted into an AGD program can begin taking graduate coursework during their senior year. Programs offering an accelerated master’s degree option may allow up to 12 hours of graduate level coursework. Programs offering an accelerated doctoral degree option may allow up to 18 hours of graduate level coursework.

Programs may use one of two models for the AGD option. For those offering a 3+ graduate option, the department may allow specified graduate-level courses to double-count as fulfilling a portion of the bachelor’s and master’s degree requirements. For those offering an accelerated graduate degree option, the department will specify the graduate-level courses that to double­ count as fulfilling a portion of the bachelor’s and master’s degree requirements and those graduate-level courses that will serve as electives for completion of the baccalaureate degree but not the graduate degree. Each program offering an AGD will clearly list how students may count courses for both degrees in the description of the degree options presented subsequently in this catalog.

Advantages of an Accelerated Degree

  • complete the bachelor’s degree with fewer credit hours (Note: Students must meet all other degree requirements for the bachelor’s degree);
  • begin work on the graduate degree during the senior year;
  • complete a portion of graduate credits paying undergraduate tuition rates;
  • earn a bachelor’s and graduate degree in less time.

Eligibility Requirements for Accelerated Graduate Degree

  • must have completed at least 90 hours toward the bachelor’s degree;
  • must have at least a 3.30 overall undergraduate GPA;
  • must have at least a 3.30 GPA in the major;
  • must meet the admission requirements of the chosen master’s degree program. (Note: AGD programs may have admission requirements that differ from the admission requirements for the regular master’s degree. For example, some departments might waive the required admission test, such as the GRE, GMAT or Miller Analogies. Students should check with the chosen master’s degree program.)

How to Apply

  1. During the junior or senior year, eligible students should meet with their undergraduate advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies of their chosen master’s degree program to develop an AGD Plan of Study. The Plan of Study form is available from the Graduate College office or online at the Graduate College website. The completed, signed, and approved Plan of Study must be submitted to the Graduate College. Any changes to the AGD Plan of Study must be approved by the undergraduate advisor and Director of Graduate Studies and submitted in writing to the Dean of the Graduate College.
  2. The student’s acceptance into the AGD program is subject to the approval of the Plan of Study by the Dean of the Graduate College.
  3. Students accepted into the AGD program should apply for admission to the chosen master’s degree program for the first semester after the bachelor’s degree is awarded. Applications should be submitted during the last semester of the senior year.

Requirements for Continuation in the AGD Degree Program

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 for all graduate credit toward their master’s degree program.

Withdrawal from the AGD

A student may withdraw at any time from an approved AGD program by informing the undergraduate advisor, the Director of Graduate Studies, and the Dean of the Graduate College in writing. A student’s status will then revert to the standard undergraduate degree program. Any graduate hours earned must be approved for use in fulfillment of bachelor’s degree requirements by the student’s Undergraduate Dean.

From Undergraduate to Graduate Student

Beginning with the semester after the student has earned the bachelor’s degree and has been accepted into a master’s degree program, the student is enrolled in the Graduate College and is assessed tuition and fees at the graduate rate. All rules regarding graduate education will apply to the student once admitted into the master’s degree program.

Master’s Programs that offer the AGD

  • Criminal Justice
  • Geography
  • Health Informatics
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Political Science
  • Psychology
  • Public Health
  • Sociology

Advising

Academic advising provides academic guidance, professional identification, and educational enrichment.

At the time of admission, students are assigned an academic program advisor. The student and advisor prepare a Plan of Study during the semester the student is admitted. The program outlined in the Plan of Study should be chosen on the basis of the student’s interests and needs and should meet program requirements.

  • Any unapproved deviations from the Plan of Study may result in delayed program completion and/or graduation. To amend the Plan of Study the student must consult with his or her academic program advisor. When a student applies for graduation or for certification there must be agreement between the Plan of Study and the record of courses taken by the student.
  • If the student writes a thesis or dissertation, the advisor or other designated person directs the student in that work. The advisor usually serves as chair of the committee to conduct the student’s comprehensive assessment, assembles questions for any written and oral examination, and reports the result of the examination to the Graduate College.
  • A current list of faculty advisors by program can be found online at www.marshall.edu/graduate.

Application for Graduation

The application for graduation must be completed and submitted before or at the beginning of the student’s final semester/term, but not later than the date printed in the University Calendar.  Applications for graduation, prior to the published deadline, are completed through myMU.

For diploma fee information, see “Special Student Fees” at www.marshall.edu/bursar. Students planning to graduate in a particular semester or term must provide all data to be applied toward the graduation to the Graduate College office in Huntington by the advertised last day for the submission of the final grades for the semester or term. This documentation is to include official transcripts from institutions external to Marshall. Said transcripts must be received in the Graduate College Office by the stated deadline. All incomplete grades must be officially removed by the accepted University procedure by this same deadline. Failure on the part of students to comply with this policy will result in their being removed from the graduation list for the term in question.

Note on Transfer Credit

All transfer credit (and official transcripts) must be sent directly to the Graduate Admissions office or the Graduate Records office in South Charleston and received no later than the date for submitting final grades established by the Registrar. Should the transcript not be received by this deadline, the student’s name will be removed from the final graduation list.

Note on Incomplete Grades and PR Grades

All grades of I must be removed by the end of the term and the Grade Change Form for said grade must be received by the Graduate College office in Huntington no later than the date for submitting final grades established by the Registrar. This also applies to the recording of grades for thesis. Failure to meet this deadline will cause the student’s name to be removed from the final graduation list.

Area of Emphasis

(see also Changing Area of Emphasis)

An area of emphasis is a specific subject area of study which has defined course offerings within an approved degree program and major.

Although a student might take continuing education and/or development courses after receiving a graduate degree, Areas of emphasis for any given degree cannot be added after that degree has been obtained.

Attendance

See Class Attendance Policy.

Auditing

Students who wish to register for a course without earning credit may register as an audit. The cost incurred is the same as if the course were taken for credit. Students who complete audit requirements for a course receive a grade of AUD which carries no earned credit hours. Students who wish to audit a class should secure instructor approval before registration. Attendance and other requirements for auditors shall be determined by the instructor of the course being audited. It is the responsibility of the instructor to discuss the requirements of the course with the auditor. It is the prerogative of the instructor to notify the respective Dean and the Registrar’s Office to withdraw the auditor from the class if attendance or other requirements are not met.

Staff Development courses may not be taken under the audit option.

It is not possible to change a registration from credit to audit or audit to credit after the close of the schedule adjustment period at the beginning of a semester or summer term.

Certificate Programs

Certificate programs are professional continuing education programs of typically 12 to 21 credit hours as designated by the program faculty and available to students admitted under the Certificate/Professional Development and Degree-seeking categories. The main purpose of certificate programs is to provide opportunities to students to complete a cohesive program of coursework that is less than a graduate degree, but which provides advanced training in a specific area. For detailed information about all certificate programs please see www.marshall.edu/graduate.

Changing Areas of Emphasis

To change the area of emphasis in a degree program, submit a Change of Area of Emphasis form for approval. There is no fee for this change. The form is available in the Graduate College office (OM 113) or online at the Graduate College website.

Changing Degree Programs

To change a degree program, apply for admission to the new program through the regular admission process and pay the appropriate admission fee. Note that admission to another degree program is not automatic. Students are reviewed as applicants to the new program and may be refused admission to the new program.

Students wishing to change degree programs within a department (M.S. to M.A. or MA to M.S.) may make the change by completing the Change of Degree Program form available at www.marshall.edu/graduate/current-students/forms-and-information-2 and in Old Main 113. This process does not require readmission into the program.

Class Attendance Policy

It is the responsibility of each individual instructor to evaluate the importance of student class attendance. Accordingly, each instructor prepares at the beginning of each semester a written statement in the syllabus setting forth his or her policy for consideration of unexcused absences, make-up examinations, and related matters, which will be in force for the semester. This statement is filed with the chair of the department and a statement of policy on attendance appropriate to each class is made available to students. Absences such as those resulting from illness, death in the family, or institutional activities (those approved by the academic deans, such as debate, artistic performances and athletics) and professional, work-related absences are to be excused when a student reports and verifies them to the instructor. For such excused absences, the student should be reasonably accommodated.

Commencement and Graduation

Marshall University observes two Commencement Exercises and four graduation dates during an academic year. The official graduation dates are:

  • last day of final examinations in July;
  • last day of final examinations in August;
  • day of Commencement in December;
  • day of Commencement for the spring semester.
    Students who complete all requirements for a degree at any time other than the above dates will be graduated on the next successive date. Students will not be graduated on any dates other than those noted above. Students who are graduated at the end of summer terms are invited to attend the fall Commencement Exercises.

Comprehensive Assessment

In addition to all general requirements for graduate degrees, each student will complete a comprehensive assessment that reviews the student’s content knowledge, mastery of disciplinary of creative or research methods, critical analysis, comprehension of disciplinary theory and perspectives, and ability to apply these to comprehensive questions related to the discipline. Depending upon the specific requirements of a particular program, the assessment might include such activities as the report and defense of a final project, comprehensive project, portfolio, or capstone project; thesis or dissertation and its defense; or a written comprehensive exam or oral comprehensive exam.

In this policy, the term “Comprehensive Assessment Committee” will be understood to mean any committee executing the student’s final assessment for the degree. For example, a doctoral dissertation committee would be understood to serve as the final Comprehensive Assessment Committee, if that doctoral dissertation project is considered to be the final comprehensive assessment. For additional information, see specific requirements in the appropriate program section as each program has unique options for fulfilling this requirement. Responsibility for development, scheduling and administration of the comprehensive assessment rests with the faculty of the student’s program and the appropriate dean.

The Comprehensive Assessment is the final assessment of the student’s capacity to complete scholarly research or creative work in the discipline. Typical letter grades are not assigned to the Comprehensive Assessment as the student is expected to demonstrate a level of competence equivalent to others who have earned the degree to be awarded. In other words, expectations for performance are higher than those for individual courses.

A student’s performance on the comprehensive assessment is reported to the Office of the Graduate Dean or school dean as follows:

Letter Grade Description
E Pass with distinction, indicating superior performance. This distinction is reserved for only those students whose performance far exceeded expectations established by the department.
P Pass, indicating competent performance (equivalent to a B grade or higher).
PC Pass with contingency, which may mean additional requirements for the student as determined by the faculty.
U Unsatisfactory, indicating that performance has not met the minimum standards of Marshall University Graduate College.

The decision on the grade is made by a majority vote of the members of the committee, consisting of at least two faculty members with the appropriate graduate faculty status, and forwarded by the chair to the Graduate Dean on a form provided by the Graduate College Office. All graduate students must pass a final comprehensive assessment to be eligible for graduation.

Unless more restrictive guidelines are specified in the individual program description in this catalog, no more than two reassessments are permitted. In the event students fail to pass an assessment, they will be placed on probation and, prior to reassessment, must meet with their examining committee to discuss deficiencies and steps to correct them. Students may be assessed only one time a term or semester. When students fail the second reassessment, the department will recommend their dismissal by the Graduate College.

Comprehensive Assessment Committee: Master’s Degrees and Education Specialist Degrees

A Comprehensive Assessment Committee must evaluate each student’s performance on the comprehensive assessment. The student’s graduate advisor or graduate program director selects the chair and other member(s) of the Comprehensive Assessment Committee. The committee chair must have at least “Graduate” level membership in the Marshall University graduate faculty. There must be a minimum of two voting members on every Comprehensive Assessment Committee, including the committee chair, except in the case where a national standardized exam is used as the only assessment, in which case only the person serving as chair is needed. Other than the chair, all other assessment committee voting members must have at least “Associate” level membership in the Marshall University graduate faculty. A majority of the student’s Comprehen­sive Assessment Committee voting members must have appointments within the college of the student’s major.

With the approval of the department or division chair or head and the student’s Comprehen­sive Assessment Committee chair, other professionally or educationally qualified people may be invited to act as non-voting members of the committee.

In the event of a tie-vote when determining the outcome of the student’s comprehensive assessment, the college or school dean is to select one additional faculty member to break the tie. This additional member must be from the college of the student’s major and must have at least “Graduate” level membership in the Marshall University graduate faculty. This also might require the assessment to be executed a second time with the new committee member’s personal direct involvement.

In the case of written or oral examinations, the chair of the student’s Comprehensive Assessment Committee prepares the questions for the written examination in consultation with other faculty members on the committee, and conducts the oral assessment with the other committee members present. The student may check with the program or department for availability of past assessments or study guides for review.

For any specific student, any exceptions to the above policies must be approved by the dean of the Graduate College on an individual basis. The dean of the Graduate College will notify the chair of Marshall University’s Graduate Council of any exceptions which were approved and give the reasons for each exception.

Comprehensive Assessment Committee: Doctoral Degrees (Other than Doctor of Medicine Degrees)

A final Comprehensive Assessment Committee must evaluate each student’s performance on the doctoral degree final comprehensive assessment. Other preliminary or intermediate assess­ments vary by program and department policy. The student selects the chair and other members of the final Comprehensive Assessment Committee, subject to the approval of the student’s graduate advisor or program director, and dean. The committee chair must have “Doctoral” level membership in the Marshall University graduate faculty. There must be a minimum of three voting members on every doctoral Comprehensive Assessment Committee, including the committee chair. Other than the chair, all other assessment committee voting members must have at least “Gradu­ate” level membership in the Marshall University graduate faculty. Professional programs may alternatively choose to include a maximum of one external, professionally qualified voting member who would not need graduate faculty membership, and who would serve as one of the three or more voting members. A majority of the student’s Comprehensive Assessment Committee members must have faculty appointments within the college of the student’s major.

In the event that more than one member of the final Comprehensive Assessment Committee votes not to approve the student’s performance as a result of the assessment, the doctoral degree cannot be recommended. At the discretion of a majority of the committee, the student may be given one additional chance to satisfy the committee to the point that no more than one committee member refuses to approve the student’s performance on the comprehensive assessment.

For any student, exceptions to the above policies must be approved by the dean of the Graduate College on an individual basis. The dean of the Graduate College will notify the chair of Marshall University’s Graduate Council of any exceptions which were approved and give the reasons for each exception.

Course Load

A normal course load for graduate students is nine to twelve semester hours in the Fall and Spring semesters, and four to six semester hours in each of the summer terms. Any student seeking registration beyond this limit must request a course overload approval in the Graduate College office.

Course Numbering

Graduate courses numbered 500-599 may be similar to certain undergraduate 400-499 series courses and may meet jointly. A Marshall University course taken at the 500 level will not meet degree requirements if it was already taken at the 400 level. Courses numbered 600-699 and 700-899 are open only to graduate students. Exceptions to this policy sometimes are granted to seniors with excellent academic records. See Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses.

Credit Hour

One lecture credit hour is given normally for each 15 classroom contact hours plus 30 hours of outside preparation or equivalent. One laboratory credit hour requires at least 30 hours of laboratory work per one lecture credit plus necessary outside preparation or equivalent. Laboratory experiences are complements to classroom courses that focus on the theory and principles of the discipline. They are organized activities involving the observation and verifica­tion of experiments and experimental techniques.

Degree Program

(See also Changing Degree Programs)

A degree program is a unified, complementary series of courses or learning experiences that lead to a degree.

Degrees

Marshall University offers programs of study leading to the degrees of:

  • Master of Arts, M.A.
  • Master of Arts in Teaching, M.A.T.
  • Master of Arts in Journalism, M.A.J.
  • Master of Business Administration, M.B.A.
  • Master of Medical Science, M.M.S.
  • Master of Public Administration, M.P.A.
  • Master of Public Health, M.P.H.
  • Master of Science, M.S.
  • Master of Science in Engineering, M.S.E.
  • Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, M.S.M.E.
  • Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, M.S.E.E.
  • Master of Science in Nursing, M.S.N.
  • Master of Social Work, M.S.W.
  • Education Specialist, Ed.S.
  • Doctor of Education, Ed.D.
  • Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice and Management, D.N.A.P.
  • Doctor of Pharmacy, Pharm.D.
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D.
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy, D.P.T.
  • Doctor of Psychology, Psy.D.

Dismissal from Program

Only grades of A, B, C, CR, or S are acceptable in fulfilling graduate degree requirements on any Plan of Study.

Particular programs may require higher performance than C in certain courses. Exclusively, all courses completed after admission to the current degree program, along with any previous Marshall University coursework to be counted toward the current degree (should be in the student’s Plan of Study), will be used to calculate the student’s GPA--no other courses will be included in the GPA.

Several programs maintain a policy that stipulates dismissal of students who earn two grades of C or less. Repeating a course for a higher grade does not negate the existence of the former grade. As such, a student may be dismissed from the program upon earning a second grade of C or less even if the student repeated a course and earned a higher grade. Students are advised to review with care the degree requirements for their program of study in the Graduate Catalog published the year they began the program.

A graduate student is required to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 for this coursework. If, upon the completion of 12 hours or thereafter, a degree student’s GPA is less than 3.0, the student may be subject to dismissal from the program. See Grade Point Average and Other Requirements for Graduation and Repeating Courses for more information.

Doctoral Degrees

Marshall University follows The U.S. Department of Education’s definition of a doctoral degree as an earned degree that carries the title of Doctor. The Doctor of Philosophy degree (Ph.D.) requires mastery within a field of knowledge and demonstrated ability to perform scholarly research. Other doctor’s degrees are awarded for fulfilling specialized requirements in professional fields, such as education (Ed.D.), management practice in nurse anesthesia (D.M.P.N.A), pharmacy (Pharm.D.), physical therapy (D.P.T.), and psychology (Psy.D.). (https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/glossary.asp)

Since 1992, Marshall University has offered the Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences. The doctorate in clinical psychology (the Psy. D.) admitted its first class in the Fall of 2002. The Ed.D. features majors in Curriculum and Instruction and Educational Leadership. The Doctor of Nurse Anesthesia Practice and Management (D.N.A.P.) is offered by the College of Business in collaboration with the School of Nurse Anesthesia of the Charleston Area Medical Center. In 2011, Marshall University added the Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.), and Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degrees.

Dropping Courses and Completely Withdrawing from the University

(See also Medical Withdrawal)

  1. Dropping Individual Courses
    • Day classes: Students can drop individual courses after the Schedule Adjustment period and during the Withdrawal period which lasts until the Friday of the tenth week of class during a regular semester. The exact last day for dropping individual courses is always published in the Academic Calendar for any given semester or term. A student must get a “Schedule Adjustment and Class Drop Form” from the Registrar’s Office, or any departmental office, fill in the required course drop information, and then obtain the signature of the course instructor. If a student is on academic probation, he/she must also get the approval and signature of the Graduate Dean associate dean of his/her college and bring the completed form to the Registrar’s Office, or the registration area in South Charleston.
    • E-Course Withdrawal Period: The withdrawal policy for e-courses parallels that for regular courses. A student can withdraw from an individual e-course through 2/3 of the official course length. After that time, only a complete withdrawal from the university is allowed. The refund policy for e-courses also parallels that of regular courses.
    • Night or Off-Campus classes, or E-Courses: Classes that meet at 4:00 p.m. or after, off campus, or online do not require instructor signature and may be withdrawn in person at the Office of the Registrar, by sending an e-mail from the student’s MU e-mail address to registrar@marshall.edu, or by mailing a request for withdrawal to the Registrar. If a student is on academic probation he/she must have the approval signature of his/her associate dean. The date of the e-mail or postmark on mail requests is the official date of withdrawal.
  2. Withdrawal from the University
    Withdrawal from the university is defined as dropping all classes for which a student is registered.
    The student must submit a withdrawal form to the Registrar, e-mail registrar@marshall.edu, or mail a request for withdrawal to the Registrar. The effective date of withdrawal is the date that the withdrawal form is submitted to the Registrar. The date of the e-mail or postmark on mail requests is the official date of withdrawal.
  3. Grades Assigned in Case of Dropping Courses or Withdrawal from the University
    In all cases of dropping courses or withdrawal from the University the instructors will report grades as follows:
    1. A student dropping courses or withdrawing from the University on or before the tenth Friday after the first class day of the regular semester will receive a grade of “W.’’ For eight-week courses, summer sessions and other courses of varying lengths, the “W’’ period ends the Friday immediately following the two-thirds point in the course. Exact “W” dates are identified in the annual University Academic Calendar.
    2. A “W” grade (withdrew) will have no bearing on the student’s Grade Point Average.
    3. Students who drop courses without approval, or who do not follow regulations provided in the preceding paragraphs, receive a grade of “F’’ at the end of the Semester or summer term.
  4. Final Date for Dropping or Withdrawing
    The final date for dropping an individual class is the tenth Friday in a regular term. Students wishing to drop a course after the last day to withdraw must withdraw from all courses in which they are enrolled. The last date for complete withdrawal from the University is the last day of classes. In both cases, “W” grades are assigned.
  5. Military Service
    Men and women called to active duty in the armed services of the United States shall be granted full refund of fees, but no credit, if the call comes before the end of the first three-fourths of the semester or term, and full credit, but no refund of fees, shall be granted if the call comes thereafter; provided, however, that credit as described above will be granted only in those courses in which the student is maintaining a passing mark at the time of departure to military service. The term “called to active duty’’ is herein defined as being called to active duty as the result of the federal activation of a total reserve component, National Guard unit, or any portion thereof which involves a particular student or an individual who is a bona fide member of the reserve component or a National Guard unit. The final grades, both passing and failing, for three-fourths of a semester or more are to be shown on the student’s permanent record.

Dual Degrees

Students who wish to seek admission to more than one degree program, whether sequentially or simultaneously, must complete a separate application, pay the non-refundable applica­tion fee, and meet all admission requirements for each academic program for which admission is sought. A maximum of 12 semester hours may be used in common among the degrees, with the approval of the department from which the degrees are sought. Such approval must be obtained in writing and put on file in the Graduate College Office at the time the student begins the subsequent master’s degree program. All applicable coursework must meet time limitations.

Not all departments may accept a student who is already admitted to another graduate level program. Prior to submitting a Graduate Application for Admission, please check with the academic department(s) of the program(s) in which you are interested.

Education Specialist

Marshall University also offers the Education Specialist (Ed.S.) degree in Education and in School Psychology. Under the Ed.S. in Education, students may select an areas of emphasis in Curriculum and Instruction. For more information, check the appropriate program description in this catalog, or contact the department offering the degree.

Final Grades

Marshall University mails final grades only upon student request. Grades will be available online using myMU. Requests to have grades mailed to the permanent address in the student information system may be submitted online using myMU or by submitting a written request to the Office of the Registrar, One John Marshall Drive, Huntington, WV 25755. Written requests must contain name, student number, and signature of the student.

Full-Time Graduate Student

The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission defines a full-time graduate student at Marshall University as carrying nine or more semester hours in a regular semester. During a single summer term a full-time graduate student carries four or more semester hours. This may differ from the definition for fee purposes. (See Financial Information.)

Four-Plus-One Degree Programs

See Accelerated Graduate Degree Program.

Grade Information and Regulations

Grade Point Average Defined

Anywhere in this catalog where GPA is discussed, unless otherwise noted, GPA means degree GPA. However, the final transcript GPA includes all graduate-level grades taken at Marshall University at any time, regardless of whether or not they count toward the student’s degree. The GPA is calculated only on graduate coursework taken at Marshall University, and only includes coursework taken within the past seven years, or older for coursework that has been revalidated (see Time Limitations for coursework older than seven years). Exclusively, all courses completed after admission to the current degree program, along with any previous Marshall University coursework to be counted toward the current degree (should be in the student’s Plan of Study), will be used to calculate the student’s GPA—no other courses will be included in the GPA.

Courses with grades of W, PR, NC, CR, S, or U are not computed in the GPA. The grade of I is computed as an F in determining qualifications for graduation.

See Repeating Courses for more information.

Grade Point Average Requirements – Good Standing

Grades on coursework may not average lower than 3.0 at any time in the program. All grades of C or less are counted in computing the GPA, but no more than six hours of C and no grades below C may be applied toward a graduate degree. Individual degree programs may have more stringent requirements, so refer to your degree program for information.

A graduate student is required to maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 for this coursework. If, upon the completion of 12 hours or thereafter, a degree student’s GPA is less than 3.0, the student may be subject to dismissal from the program.

Grades and Quality Points

The following system of grades and quality points is used for graduate courses:

Letter Grade Description
A For achievement of distinction. Four quality points are earned for each semester hour with a grade of A.
B For competent and acceptable work. Three quality points are earned for each semester hour with a grade of B.
C For below average performance. Two quality points are earned for each semester hour with a grade of C. (No more than six hours of C may be applied toward a graduate degree.)
D For patently substandard work. One quality point is earned for each semester hour with a grade of D. (No grade of D may be applied toward a graduate degree.)
F Failure, given for unsatisfactory work. No quality points.
W Withdrawn on or before the tenth Friday after the first class day of the regular semester or the Friday after the two-thirds point in the summer session. “W” grades are assigned for complete withdrawals.
I An I grade (Incomplete) is given to students who do not complete course requirements because of illness or for some other valid reason (see Incomplete Grade). The I grade is not considered in determining the Grade Point Average. The student has the responsibility of completing the work within the period defined by the instructor. This period is typically the end of the next fall or spring semester, whichever comes earlier, after the semester in which the incomplete grade was assigned. If the work is completed satisfactorily, one of the four passing marks will be awarded. If the work is unsatisfactory or the student fails to complete the work within the allotted time, an F or failing grade will be recorded. All grades remain on the student’s permanent record as originally submitted by the course instructor. Any grade change is added to the permanent record.
CR/NC Recorded as CR (for satisfactory performance) or NC (for unsatisfactory performance) for courses designated by the department or division for credit/no credit grading. CR and NC are not considered in determining the Grade Point Average.
S/U For certain courses, which are so designated in the catalog, every student is given a grade of S, which denotes satisfactory completion of the course, or U, which denotes unsatisfactory work. S and U are not considered in determining the Grade Point Average.
PR Indicates progress on a thesis, dissertation or in select research courses. It is replaced by the final grade upon completion up to established credit limits.

Note: At the graduate level, the grades of CR and S are considered the equivalent of the grade of B or higher.

Graduate Assistantships

Many departments offering graduate degrees as well as non-academic units have graduate assistantships available. The amount of the award will vary depending upon the unit offering the assistantship, the residency status of the student, and the time commitment required (10 hours a week or 20 hours a week). All awards include a stipend and a waiver of a portion of the tuition.

Graduate Assistantships are available each semester in teaching, research, or administrative work. Reappointment depends on job performance and academic progress. Please note that a student cannot hold more than one Graduate Assistantship at a time. More information is at this site: www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-assistantships-2/graduate-assistantship-overview.

Eligibility

  • Full or Conditional admission to a graduate degree-granting program at Marshall University;
  • First-time graduate students must have a minimum undergraduate GPA of 2.75 on a 4.0 scale for all previously completed undergraduate coursework; returning GA’s must have a minimum graduate GPA of 3.0;
  • During Fall or Spring semester must be enrolled for at least 9 hours of graduate coursework for a full-time assistantship or at least 3 hours of graduate coursework for a half-time assistantship; during summer terms must be enrolled for at least 4 hours of graduate coursework for a full-time assistantship or at least 2 hours of graduate coursework for a half-time assistantship. Note: undergraduate hours are eligible for a tuition benefit when required in a student’s graduate program.

Apply for an assistantship by contacting the department in which you intend to be enrolled.

Note: By an act of Congress, all graduate assistants must submit an approved I-9 form. Payment of the GA stipend will not be authorized until this form is accepted by the Human Resources Office.

Inquiries about graduate fellowships, work-study opportunities, loans, and other forms of financial assistance for graduate students should be directed to the Graduate College Office or to the Office of Student Financial Assistance, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755.

Grade Point Average and Other Requirements for Graduation

The requirements for graduation include completion of the program requirements, successful completion of required comprehensive assessments, a GPA of at least 3.0 (see Grade Information and Regulations), and satisfactory fulfillment of other academic requirements as may be established by the various programs. Additionally, the student must have at least a 3.0 GPA in the major, or in Core courses of an interdisciplinary program. Only grades of A, B, C, CR, or S are acceptable in fulfilling graduate degree requirements on any Plan of Study. Particular programs may require higher performance than C in certain courses. Grades of W, PR, CR, NC, S, U, and I are not counted in the GPA calculation, except that an I grade will be calculated as an F (for courses where a letter grade is normally given), NC, or U, depending on the type of course, for determining qualifications for graduation.

Additional Requirements

  • Only grades of C or better may be used to fulfill degree requirements and no more than six hours of C may be applied toward fulfilling the degree. All students should review their degree program with care as some programs may have more stringent requirements.
  • In addition to thesis/dissertation credit, up to six hours of CR or S may be included within a degree program. These grades do not affect the GPA.
  • Master’s degree students must complete a minimum of 30 hours of graduate coursework. For programs requiring a thesis, a minimum of 3 and a maximum credit of 6 hours may be granted for the thesis toward the total degree credits, except in chemistry and biological sciences, where up to 12 thesis hours may be applied toward the MS degree. All students should consult their degree program as many require more than 30 hours for the degree.
  • Students must complete a minimum of 18 hours in the major subject. The major department may optionally require a minor with a minimum of 6 hours in another subject.
  • With the approval of the advisor, students may complete courses in a third field. In special teacher-education curricula, courses may be distributed among several fields with the approval of the advisor.
  • Graduate courses range in number from 500 to 899. Selected courses allow enrollment of undergraduate as well as graduate courses with undergraduates enrolled in the 400 level section and graduate students enrolled in the 500 level section. The graduate students enrolled in these courses will complete more work than undergraduates including, but not limited to, additional extensive reading, additional course projects, and other tasks the instructor deems necessary for graduate course credit.
  • A Marshall University course taken at the 400 level cannot be retaken at the 500 level; it will not be applicable to the graduate degree.
  • At least one-half of the minimum required hours for the student’s master’s degree must be earned in classes numbered 600 or greater.
  • Students whose Plan of Study requires a thesis or dissertation must complete all required course work as specified in the previous points and have the manuscript of the thesis/dissertation approved for publication in the ProQuest database (www.proquest.com/index) by the Dean of the Graduate College.

Meeting minimum requirements in hours of credit does not necessarily constitute eligibility for the degree. The work taken must constitute a unified and approved program in the field. Some programs may require specific performance on a national exam as a requirement for graduation.

During the seven-year time limit, Marshall University reserves the right to advise students pursuing the master’s or Ed.S. degrees of their status on academic performance related to the probability of receiving a degree within the prescribed time limit.

Graduate Student Employment

Graduate students who are employed should limit their schedules in proportion to the time available for graduate study. As a general practice, the maximum graduate load recommended for a student who is employed full-time is six hours in a regular semester or three hours in a summer term.

Hybrid Courses

Hybrid course refers to any distance education course in which a portion of the course is delivered synchronously with scheduled and required online, face-to-face, or on-site attendance requirements; the remainder of the course is delivered asynchronously. Types of hybrid courses include the following delivery modes and are designated in the Marshall University schedule of courses:

  • T-course is a hybrid course in which 25% or more of the course is delivered synchronously requiring scheduled face-to-face or online attendance (Technology Enhanced: TE).
  • V-course is a synchronous course in which the faculty member holds live class meetings in person, by technological means, or by both delivery formats simultaneously (Virtual Class: VC).
  • IV-course is a synchronous course in which the faculty member holds live class meetings using the interactive video system (Interactive Video: IV).

Hybrid courses start and end on the same dates as the regular semester courses and are not assessed an additional per credit hour fee. Hybrid courses also use the Blackboard learning management system to deliver technology-enhanced or virtual courses. Students may visit www.marshall.edu/muonline for complete information on hybrid courses, including technical requirements, student readiness, and course listing.

Incomplete Grade

An I grade (Incomplete) is given to students who have completed at least three quarters of the work for the course, as determined by the instructor, but who do not complete course requirements for reasons deemed acceptable to the course instructor. The I grade is not considered in determining the Grade Point Average, except for graduation. Students must be in good standing in the class prior to requesting an incomplete. The course instructor decides whether or not an incomplete will be granted and specifies in writing what work the student must complete to fulfill the course requirements; this remaining-requirements description is to be submitted with the University’s Incomplete Grade Form, with copies to the student and the instructor. To complete the course, the student has until the end of the next fall or spring semester, whichever comes earlier, after the semester in which the incomplete grade was assigned, or the instructor may establish an earlier deadline. If extenuating circumstances exist, which prevent the student from completing the course in the prescribed time, the incomplete grade may be extended with written approval of the instructor, the instructor’s chair or division head, and the appropriate dean. If the student satisfactorily completes the course in the prescribed time he/she will receive either a letter grade, a CR grade, or an S grade, depending upon what type of grade is appropriate for the course. If the student fails to complete the course requirements during the stipulated time, the grade of I changes to a grade of F, NC, or U, depending on the type of grade appropriate for the course. All grades remain on the student’s permanent record as originally submitted by the course instructor, except for I grades that have been completed and changed by the instructor. Any grade change is added to the permanent record.

Independent Study

Independent Studies are tutorials, directed and independent readings, directed and independent research, problem reports, and other individualized activities which allow students to explore in depth a specific aspect of a discipline or professional field not covered by the established curriculum. The independent study topic is not covered (or not covered in sufficient depth) by courses inside or outside of the student’s degree program. Written objectives of each independent study course, approved by the chair and dean, must be maintained in departmental files.

Ineligibility for Scholastic Deficiencies

See Academic Rights and Responsibilities of Students.

In-Service Teacher Restriction

In addition to offering teacher preparation programs, Marshall University is actively involved in the continuing education of all professional teachers. The West Virginia Board of Education has approved a program of continuing education for teachers and school service personnel. Informa­tion relative to a teacher’s renewing a professional certificate is available from the certification specialist, College of Education and Professional Development, 304-696-2857 in Huntington and 304-746-1909 in South Charleston. The teacher must have approval of his/her renewal advisor prior to enrolling in any course which is to be used for certificate renewal, salary classification, or additional endorsements.

Internships

Internships are supervised, contractual work-study arrangements with profes­sional agencies or institutions.

Major

A major is a field of study within an approved degree program, having its own prescribed curriculum. A degree program may have more than one major.

Master’s Degrees

Marshall University follows The U.S. Department of Education’s definition of a master’s degree as a degree awarded for successful completion of a program generally requiring 1 or 2 years of full-time college-level study beyond the bachelor’s degree. The Master of Arts (M.A.) and the Master of Science (M.S.) are programs offered by several of the university’s colleges for advanced scholarship in the discipline and demonstrated ability to perform scholarly research. A second type of master’s degree is awarded for the completion of a professionally oriented program of study in business administration (M.B.A), education (M.Ed. and M.A.T.), engineering (M.S.E.), journalism (M.A.J.), nursing (M.S.N.), public health (M.P.H.), social work (M.S.W.), and public administration (M.P.A.) (https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/glossary.asp)

Marshall University offers a wide array of master’s degrees. The master’s may serve one or more of the following purposes: to provide greater specialization within one’s area of interest; to facilitate licensure in certain fields; to provide access to Education Specialist or doctoral degrees; to support professional advancement, and to promote intellectual growth and personal fulfillment.

Medical/Emergency Withdrawal Policy

(See also Dropping Courses and Completely Withdrawing from the University)

A student may request and be considered for a medical or emergency withdrawal when extraordinary circumstances, such as a serious illness, injury, or catastrophic situation prevents the student from continuing classes. The policy covers physical and mental health, as well as life-changing difficulties.

A medical/emergency withdrawal from the university will constitute a full withdrawal from all academic classes for the requested semester, with the exception of those classes whose completion dates occurred prior to the withdrawal. Refund of tuition and fees will be a separate determination, as will eligibility for future financial aid. These decisions will follow policies, guidelines and schedules set forth by the university and state and federal government.

If a student is currently enrolled, consideration should be given to withdrawing from those courses through the regular process prior to requesting a medical/emergency withdrawal.

A request for a medical/emergency withdrawal must be filed within six months of the end of the semester involved unless the student can provide rationale and documentation to show that it was not possible to make the request within this timeframe. Students may apply for a medical/emergency withdrawal by following the guidelines provided below. Application for a medical/emergency withdrawal does not guarantee that a withdrawal will be granted. All requests are evaluated on an individual basis.

All students requesting a medical/emergency withdrawal submit a complete packet of information to the Associate Dean of Student Affairs. The packet must include:

  1. Completed Request for medical/emergency withdrawal in the form of a typed, signed letter, or e-mail from the student’s Marshall e-mail account, explaining how the illness, condition, or situation affected their ability to maintain their status as a student at the university and why withdrawing from courses through the regular process is/was not an option for them. The request must also include the student’s Marshall ID number and mailing address. Incomplete grades in courses may be arranged in compliance with university policy, and may be an option for students to consider instead of a medical/emergency withdrawal.
  2. For medical withdrawal: Typed letter from the student’s treating physician(s) recommending a withdrawal for medical reasons. The letter must state the specific rationale for the recommendation, including diagnosis or medical impressions; why the illness or condition prevented the student from maintaining their status as a student at the university; the effective date of the onset of the illness or condition; dates of treatment; and anticipated date of resolution, if applicable. The letter must be on official letterhead and must be signed by the service provider. The letter may be faxed from the treatment provider’s fax machine. Medical information will be kept confidential.

    For withdrawal due to catastrophic event: Documentation sufficient to support the student’s claim of involvement in a catastrophic situation. Said documentation will vary depending on the situation and should follow guidelines set forth by the Associate Dean of Student Affairs.
    A request for a medical/emergency withdrawal without the supporting rationale will not be considered.
  3. Complete Medical/Emergency Withdrawal Consultation Form, Financial Aid.
  4. Complete Medical/Emergency withdrawal Consultation Form, Residence Services (if applicable)
  5. Complete Medical/Emergency withdrawal Consultation Form, International Students (if applicable)
  6. Other relevant supporting documentation as needed.

If the withdrawal is granted, the student will be unable to register for classes until he or she provides the Office of Student Affairs with a letter from their health care provider(s) (in the case of a medical withdrawal) releasing the student to return to the university and outlining the student’s sufficient ability to manage coursework at Marshall. In the case of a catastrophic event, the student must provide a written statement that outlines the satisfactory resolution of the negative impact of the event.

The Office of Student Affairs will send a notice to the student regarding the outcome of the medical/emergency withdrawal request.

Minor

Minors approved by the Graduate Council to which code numbers have been assigned may appear on a graduate student’s transcript if the following conditions are met:

  • the student’s advisor approves the minor courses as part of the student’s Plan of Study; and
  • the program offering the minor allows it to be designated as the student’s minor. Such permission must be obtained in writing. The department or division chair in the minor program signs the student’s Plan of Study to signify approval.

As of the date of this catalog, the following graduate minors are available: (please see department information for requirements):

  • Anthropology
  • Classics
  • Criminal Justice
  • Exercise Science
  • Environmental Science
  • Geobiophysical Science
  • Geography
  • History
  • Mathematics
  • Philosophy
  • Psychology
  • Safety
  • Sport Studies
  • Sociology

Multiple Degrees

See Dual Degrees.

Non-degree Students

  • Persons who desire university instruction without becoming graduate degree candidates may attend as non-degree students, provided they have received a bachelor’s degree from an accepted, regionally accredited undergraduate college or university.
  • Before enrolling in a class, non-degree graduate students must obtain permission from the instructor. Students wishing to take courses offered by the College of Business must secure approval of the academic advisor. The fees for attendance as a non-degree student are the same as those set for other graduate students. Non-degree enrollment for graduate courses is not available to persons under suspension by the university.
  • A non-degree student who does not hold a master’s or higher degree may take a maximum of 15 semester hours. Permission for non-degree students to register for additional hours beyond 15 can be granted by the Dean of the Graduate College or the Dean of the Graduate School of Education and Professional Development.
  • Applicants for non-degree status will complete a Graduate Application for Admission, pay the application fee, and have the registrar send an official transcript showing proof of a bachelor’s degree from an accepted, regionally accredited undergraduate college or university not later than the scheduled time of registration.
  • A person holding a graduate degree may take an unrestricted number of additional courses for which he/she has the prerequisites and departmental permission, provided both a transcript showing the undergraduate degree and a transcript showing a master’s degree or higher (both from an accepted, regionally accredited college or university) are submitted. All transcripts must be official and sent to Graduate Admissions directly from the registrar.
  • Non-degree graduate students may apply later for admission to degree programs by filing the necessary documents, provided they meet the admission requirements described in the current Marshall University Graduate Catalog. However, work taken as a non-degree student cannot in itself qualify a person for admission as a degree candidate. Only credit approved by the assigned program advisor and the appropriate dean will be counted toward a degree awarded by the university.

Online Courses

(See also Hybrid Courses)

Online courses are online versions of classes offered on the Marshall campuses in which 100% of the content is delivered asynchronously over the Internet. Online courses are designated as such in the Schedule of Courses (Online Course: OC).

Online courses are delivered with the Blackboard learning management system (LMS). E-mail communication and delivery of assignments, readings, and other course materials between students and instructors occurs digitally within the LMS. There are no required on-campus or real-time meetings and instructors may occasionally use MU e-mail or other forms of online contact to communicate with students. Online courses generally follow the University calendar for the term in which they are offered, but individual exceptions may apply.

Students should check the syllabus for each individual class for a beginning and ending date. Students may register for online courses using myMU during the designated registration periods each term, in person at the Registrar’s Office, or by mail. Hours of enrollment are reflected in the actual term in which the student is registered. For all verification purposes, hours of enrollment are counted only in the term in which the student is registered. Note that the withdrawal period for online courses parallels that of regular courses. A student may withdraw from an individual online course through 2/3 of the official course length. After that time, only a complete withdrawal from the university is allowed. The refund policy for online courses also parallels that of regular courses.

Online courses are currently assessed a fee per credit hour for graduate courses, regardless of residency or number of credit hours the student may be registered for in addition to the online courses. Current online course fees can be located on the Bursar’s website at www.marshall.edu/bursar. Students may visit www.marshall.edu/muonline for complete information on online courses, including technical requirements, student readiness, and course listing.

Note: Tuition waivers are not applicable to online courses.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism (submitting as one’s own work or creation any oral, graphic, or written material wholly or in part created by another) is a form of academic dishonesty. Sanctions for academic dishonesty may range from an instructor-imposed sanction such as a failing grade in the course in which plagiarism has been documented to dismissal from the university. Refer to the section on Academic Dishonesty for the complete university policy on academic dishonesty.

Plan of Study

Each degree-seeking student at the master’s or doctoral level is required to develop a “Plan of Study” with his or her graduate advisor. The Plan of Study is a student’s “blueprint” for completing degree requirements. A student’s certification for graduation depends on completion of the Plan of Study.

A Plan of Study approved by the department/program must be submitted for approval to the appropriate dean before the student registers for his or her 12th semester hour. Students who fail to do so will have a hold placed on subsequent enrollment. If changes are made to the Plan of Study, the student’s advisor must report those changes to the appropriate dean or to his or her designee. Consult the degree programs section of the catalog for specific information about each program’s Plan of Study. See Repeating Courses for more information.

Practicum

A practicum is a learning activity that involves the application of previously learned processes, theories, systems, etc. Generally, credit is assigned on the same basis as that of a laboratory.

Prerequisites

The purpose of prerequisites for certain courses is to assure adequate preparation of the student for the information to be presented in any particular course as well as to insure a coherent, balanced, sequential, and unified set of learning experiences. Course prerequisites may be either previous undergraduate or graduate preparation. In general, course prerequisites will not be waived except by written approval of the instructor and program director or dean.

Probation

See Academic Probation.

Program

See Degree Program.

Readmission

See Time Limitation.

Repeating Courses

Students who earn a grade of C or less may repeat the course with the goal of earning a higher grade. If the course is required for the student’s plan of study, the more current grade will be used to fulfill degree requirements. All course grades, original and repeated, will be listed on the student’s Plan of Study and transcript and will be used in the calculation of GPAs.

Several programs maintain a policy that stipulates dismissal of students who earn two grades of C or less. Repeating a course for a higher grade does not negate the existence of the former grade. As such, a student may be dismissed from the program upon earning a second grade of C or less even if the student repeated a course and earned a higher grade. See Grade Point Average and Other Requirements for Graduation for more information. See also Effects of Repeated Courses in the Student Financial Assistance section.

Revalidation of Coursework

See Time Limitation.

Roles and Responsibilities of the Thesis/Dissertation Committee

The roles and responsibilities of the faculty serving on a student’s thesis/dissertation committee are manifold. In essence, the members of the committee help the student demonstrate the ability to plan and execute a scholarly and creative project while developing an expertise within the discipline. To this end, the members of the committee advise the student to ensure he or she has identified a project that will sufficiently challenge his or her skills, make use of appropriate disciplinary research and creative methods, and be completed using available resources in a timely manner. The members of the committee also ensure the highest quality of the published thesis/dissertation by requiring the student to submit a final thesis/dissertation that conforms to the preferred editorial guidelines of the discipline and the Graduate College. As such, the signature page included in the thesis/dissertation verifies that the faculty have read with care the thesis/dissertation to ensure the student’s work is without error in the form, substance, and expression of the student’s work. The members of the committee sign this page once the student has prepared a formal draft of the approved thesis/dissertation and affirm that the work meets the editorial standards of the Graduate College. The Graduate College will review the thesis/dissertation and may require revisions to ensure the work meets the required editorial guidelines before the thesis/ dissertation is released for publication.

Schedule Adjustment

Schedule adjustment is the adding of courses or dropping of courses, or the changing of class hours or days after a person has registered in any semester or term. The specific Schedule Adjustment Period for any semester or term is specified in the Academic Calendar for that semester or term. After the conclusion of the Schedule Adjustment Period, students are not permitted to add classes or make changes in class hours or days, nor are late registrations permitted except with the permission of the Graduate Dean. Dropping of classes after the Schedule Adjustment Period is discussed in the section Dropping Courses.

Scholarships

For information on available graduate scholarships see www.marshall.edu/graduate.

Second Master’s Degree

See Dual Degrees, Multiple Degrees.

Semester Hour

See Credit Hour.

Seminar

A seminar is a small group of students engaged in advanced study of the original research or some important recent advancements in the field. Seminars are organized under the direction of a faculty member, and credit is allowed according to university regulations for granting semester-hour credit.

Special Topics

Special Topics are experimental courses that may be offered twice by a given department with no prior committee approval. Such courses may satisfy university, college or department requirements toward a given degree and may carry specific requisites.

Seniors in Graduate Courses

See Undergraduate Enrollment in Graduate Courses.

Staff Development Courses

School personnel approved by their county school systems may use a departmental form to be admitted in the Staff Development category. Students admitted in this category are restricted to registering for Staff Development classes (560 series) in the College of Education and Professional Development for which they will receive credit/non-credit or satisfactory/unsatisfactory grades. Such classes cannot be used in degree, professional development or licensure programs. Students who wish to mix regular and Staff Development classes must seek regular admission to the Graduate College.

Staff Development courses are offered exclusively as Credit/No Credit and S/U. They may not be taken under the audit option and may not be applied toward the credit hour requirement for a graduate degree.

Syllabus Policy

During the first two weeks of semester classes (3 days of summer term), instructors must provide each student a copy of the course requirements which includes these items:

  • Course name and number.
  • Instructor’s name, office location, phone, e-mail address and office hours.
  • List of all required texts.
  • Attendance policy.
  • Grading policy.
  • Due dates for major projects and exams.
  • Course description from most recent catalog
  • Course student learning outcomes.
  • Schedule of class sessions and assignments.
  • Grid showing how each course student learning outcome will be practiced, and assessed, in the course.
  • Link to Official University Policies located on the Academic Affairs website.
  • Semester course meets, e.g., Spring 2012
  • Time course meets, e.g. M/W/F 1:00-1:50 p.m.
  • Course location.

This policy may not apply to the following types of courses: thesis, seminar, problem report, independent study, field work, internships and medical clerkships.

Colleges may develop more detailed requirements concerning the content of the syllabus.

Adopted by Marshall University Board of Governors, August 14, 2012.

In many cases, syllabi will be available on the World Wide Web. In the case of an Independent Study, the student must complete the necessary form, obtain the required signatures, and submit it or a permission to enroll form to the Registrar before enrolling.

Technology-Enhanced Courses (T-courses)

See Hybrid Courses.

Thesis/Dissertation

Several degree programs require or allow a student to prepare a thesis/ dissertation as partial completion of the degree requirements. These programs will specify the number of credits required for the thesis/dissertation project. If optional, the thesis/dissertation advisor and student will design a project that meets departmental requirements and the student’s needs and interests.

Students pursuing a master’s degree who will profit more by doing additional coursework in lieu of a thesis must earn at least 36 course hours of credit in most programs.

Each student planning to write a thesis/dissertation will, in collaboration with his or her advisor, form a thesis/dissertation committee. Membership on the committee is determined by Board of Governor’s Policy AA-20 which stipulates who may chair and serve on the committee. All thesis/dissertation committees must have at least a chair and two qualified faculty members. Before starting the thesis/dissertation research, the student must submit required documentation to the Office of Research Integrity (https://www.marshall.edu/ori/) for approval.

  • Students pursuing a master’s s degree who will prepare a thesis must register for a cumulative minimum of 3 credit hours of thesis. The maximum amount of credit that may be earned for the thesis is 6 hours for all departments except biology and chemistry. Research and thesis in those two fields are permitted to a maximum of 12 hours. Students in departments other than chemistry register for Thesis 681. Chemistry majors register for CHM 682 Research. The student continues to register for Thesis 681 or CHM 682 Research, as appropriate, and pay tuition for the number of hours per semester as agreed to between the student and the thesis advisor.
  • Students pursuing a doctoral degree who will prepare with a dissertation will enroll in thesis hours as directed by the student’s Plan of Study.
  • Depending on the department’s published grading system, the thesis/dissertation advisor reports an appropriate grade for satisfactory work at the end of each term or semester for which the student is registered with the total amount of credit to be allowed.
  • The thesis/dissertation must be prepared according to the instructions provided at the Graduate College website, www.marshall.edu/graduate/current-students/edt.
  • When completed, the student submits a manuscript to the advisor and committee for tentative approval. The candidate must then give a presentation open to the academic community based upon the results of the thesis/dissertation and give a satisfactory defense of the work before the committee. Upon successful defense of the thesis/dissertation, the advisor with the concurrence of the committee assigns a grade which applies to all hours earned for the thesis.
  • The members of the student’s committee may require revision of the manuscript before it may be submitted for publication. Upon completion of all required revisions, they will submit the manuscript for publication following the instructions for electronic theses and dissertations (ETD’s) located at: www.marshall.edu/graduate/current-students/edt.
  • Submission of the thesis must occur by the dates printed in the academic calendar of the term in which the student intends to graduate. If the student fails to meet these dates, the Graduate Dean may postpone the student’s graduation until the end of the following term.
  • The Graduate Dean will review the submitted thesis for style and format; students may be required to make modifications prior to final approval by the Graduate Dean. The student is eligible to graduate once the Graduate Dean submits the manuscript for publication.
  • The advisor may report a final grade of F or NC at the end of any semester or term when in his/her opinion, because of irregular reports or unsatisfactory progress, the student should not be permitted to continue to register for research.

Value and Nature of Thesis/Dissertation

The experience of collecting, assembling and interpreting a body of information for a thesis is essential in developing the capacity to do independent work. This is a primary difference between graduate and undergraduate work. For capable graduate students, preparation of the thesis/dissertation s may be of great value. To be urged to write a thesis/dissertation is a compliment to one’s ability. The presentation and oral defense of the project emphasizes the importance of graduate student research in the academic environment and give public credit to the student’s achievements. The objectives of a thesis/dissertation project include development of the ability to plan and execute a scholarly and/or analytical study and the development of expertise in a specific subject area. The thesis should illustrate that a graduate student has:

  • Comprehended the essentials of a selected subject area;
  • Demonstrated understanding of the problem selected;
  • Obtained working knowledge of research techniques appropriate to the graduate degree;
  • Demonstrated the ability to write in a professional and scholarly style;
  • Produced a study that is of value to the subject field or professional education.

Three-Plus-Two Programs

See Accelerated Graduate Degree Program and/or degree requirements section of the College of Business.

Time Limitation for Master’s and Ed.S. Degrees

The time limit for the master’s and Ed.S. degrees is seven years from the date of completion of the earliest course applied toward the degree, including transferred courses.

Time Requirement on Readmission

If a student has not completed his/her Master’s or Ed.S. degree within seven years from the end of the first graduate course to be counted toward his/her degree, and if the student has not been enrolled in a course toward that degree for the most-recent one year when that seven-year limit is reached (meaning the seventh year), then the student will be dropped from the program. To continue to work on that degree, the student must reapply for admission to that degree program through the regular graduate admission process, and pay the appropriate admission fees.

Time Extension

To ensure that a student’s knowledge base is current at the time the degree is awarded, all credit that exceeds the time limit must be revalidated.

When a student requests an extension of time, the advisor and program director or department chair should review the program of study, identify coursework which exceeds the time limit, and make a recommendation for revalidation of expired coursework through one or more of the following options: (Note: the current fee for course revalidation is $25/credit hour)

  • Option 1: Examination: A validation exam shall be the equivalent to a comprehensive final exam for the course. In most cases, validation must be done by a written exam.
  • Option 2: Independent Study: The department or program may elect to design an independent study if no course currently exists by which the student may update course content.
  • Option 3: The student may repeat expired coursework.
  • Option 4: Additional Hours: The department or program may assign additional hours of course work to ensure currency of knowledge in rapidly changing content areas.
  • Option 5: Portfolio that revalidates objectives of course(s) and degree objectives (may include work experiences, thesis or final project).

Decisions about revalidation of credit are forwarded to the graduate dean of the academic unit for approval. When the student has satisfied the conditions imposed for revalidation, the signed Plan of Study with a memorandum from the chair/program director confirming that the conditions were completed satisfactorily will be forwarded to the graduate dean of the academic unit with the completed application for graduation. The memorandum will include a statement of evidence of completion (e.g., examination, grade report, portfolio).

Outdated courses which are not revalidated will not be used in computing Grade Point Averages for graduation, but they will remain on the record.

Students completing programs in the College of Education and Professional Development which lead to certification should contact the Dean of the College of Education and Professional Development for additional information on time limitations.

Transcript

A transcript is a copy of the student’s permanent academic record. An official transcript can only be issued by the Office of the Registrar. Official transcripts cost $10.00 for paper copies and $12.00 for electronic copies, and requests will be processed within 1 to 2 business days of receipt. Processing time may be extending at the end of a term due to posting grades and degrees. Students with outstanding financial, social, or other obligations forfeit rights to a transcript until the obligations are resolved. Requests for official transcripts can be completed at www.marshall.edu, faxed, or made in person at the Office of the Registrar. Students may obtain unofficial transcripts at no cost at the Office of the Registrar or through myMU.

Transfer of Graduate Credits

A student with an approved Plan of Study may transfer to Marshall University credit earned in graduate coursework completed at another regionally accredited graduate institution provided that the courses are appropriate to the student’s program and the grades earned are B or better or equivalent, and acceptable to the advisor and Graduate Dean.

Students may not transfer courses completed seven years before the transfer request. Students may not revalidate transfer courses. If a transfer course is no longer valid, the students will need to complete an equivalent Marshall University course.

On the master’s and education specialist level, transfer credits may not exceed 12 hours. For graduate certificate programs, transfer credits may not exceed 6 credit hours.

Graduate credits transferred from other institutions will not become a part of the Grade Point Average recorded on the student’s Marshall University transcript and will simply meet credit hour requirements toward graduation.

All transfer credits must have been earned within a seven-year time limit counted from the date of enrollment in the first graduate course to be applied toward meeting degree requirements of the student’s program.

Transient Students

A student who is enrolled at another regionally accredited graduate institution may, upon submission to the Graduate Admissions office an admission application and a letter of good standing from the home university, enroll for Marshall University graduate coursework. This admission is valid for one semester only. The student must submit a new application and letter of good standing each semester he/she wishes to attend.

Normally, up to twelve credit hours of coursework may be transferred back to the home institution.

Permission to transfer credits is arranged, by the student, with the home university. Transient students who wish to register for coursework beyond twelve credit hours at Marshall are required to obtain the approval of Marshall University’s Graduate Dean.

Tuition Waiver Scholarship

A very limited number of Graduate Scholarship Tuition Waivers is available, through competitive application, to Marshall University students and full-time faculty and staff. Priority consideration is given to full-time faculty and staff MU employees.

Tuition waiver application deadlines for each upcoming semester will be posted to the Graduate College website at www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-scholarship-tuition-waiver.

Waivers cover all or a portion of System Capital fees and Educational & General fees. Waivers typically are available for one 3 credit graduate course (e-courses excluded). Students are not eligible for waivers in consecutive semesters.

Applications are available in the Graduate College office (Old Main 113) on the Huntington campus, through a student’s academic department office on the South Charleston campus, or online at www.marshall.edu/graduate/graduate-scholarship-tuition-waiver.

Beginning Fall Semester, 2013

  1. Students are eligible for one award in 3 consecutive semesters (i.e. a student who receives an award in Fall 2013, is not eligible for another award until Fall 2014; a student who receives an award in Spring 2014 is not eligible for another award until Spring 2015; a student who receives an award in Summer 2014 is not eligible for another award until Summer 2015.)
  2. Beginning with the Fall 2013 scholarship waiver period, students are limited to a maximum of 4 awards. (Past awards do not apply).

Undergraduate Students in Graduate Courses

Seniors with a cumulative GPA of at least 2.75 may register for graduate classes (500 and 600 series) after they have received approval from their undergraduate dean, the chair of the department offering the course, and the appropriate graduate college/school dean. Complete applications (available at the Graduate College website, the Graduate College office, Old Main 113, must be on file in the appropriate graduate dean’s office and permission secured prior to the opening of the term of enrollment. Credit for graduate courses completed as a senior can be applied to either an undergraduate or a graduate degree at Marshall University but not to both. No more than 12 graduate hours may be taken as an undergraduate.

Withdrawal from the University

See Dropping Courses and Completely Withdrawing from the University or Medical Withdrawal.

Workshops

Workshops are highly practical, participatory courses usually designed for advanced students or professionals. They provide experience or instruction in a new technique, theory or development in a given discipline. If credit is granted, appropriate university guidelines will be followed.